CLASP-Celebrates-Hispanic-Heritage-month-in-Washington-
SEPTEMBER 13TH, 2018

CLASP Celebrates Hispanic Heritage month in Washington

9-13-18

CLASP will cosponsor a second annual professional development day for mid-Atlantic region International Baccalaureate (IB) History and Spanish teachers and Library Media Specialists in Fairfax County, Virginia on September 26, 2018. Hosted by educators from South Lakes High School (Reston, VA) and organized by Julie Kline (Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) the workshop features presentations by three outstanding Georgetown University historians: John Tutino, Eric Gettig and Bryan McCann. The presenters will focus respectively on the Mexican Revolution, the Cold War in the Americas and on 20th Century Democratization in Latin America. The program also will include sessions on resources for teaching Latin America and the Caribbean by outreach professionals from UW-Milwaukee, Tulane, Vanderbilt and Georgetown. Library Media Specialists Linda Frantz and Mimi Marquet will also present on their LibGuide in development to support History of the Americas IB courses.

In addition, CLASP celebrates 25 year of the Américas Award with its annual award ceremony on Friday September 28th at 2:30 pm at the Library of Congress. This year’s program will be broadcast live through the Library of Congress Youtube channel. Please check it out live here.

Later that evening, the award winners Ibi Zoboi, author of American Street and Duncan Tonatiuh, author of Danza! will present to K-12 teachers at an engaging workshop co-sponsored by Teaching for Change and hosted by Howard University. Please share the event with teachers and others that are interested.-

To learn about this year’s Américas Award winners and commended titles, please review the Américas Award site here.

Américas Award Sponsors
The awards are administered by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) and coordinated by both Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies. Generous support is also provided by Florida International University, Stanford University, The Ohio State University, UNC-Duke Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Texas at Austin, University of Utah, and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Eliane-Bueno-Winner-of-2018-Teaching-Award-for-K-12-Educators
JUNE 4TH, 2018

Eliane Bueno Winner of 2018 Teaching Award for K-12 Educators

In 2018, CLASP continues the practice of bestowing the CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators to recognize excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and the Caribbean among elementary, middle, and high school teachers. “Each year the award process highlights exceptional educators from across the country and brings to light inspiring teaching practices,” said Keira Philipp-Schnurer, who serves on the CLASP Outreach Committee and was a part of the review committee.

From among the outstanding teachers nominated in 2018, CLASP recognizes Eliane (Lili) Bueno as the winner of the CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators. The award was publicly announced Friday, May 25, 2018, at the 52 International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association in Barcelona, Spain.

Lili serves as a Portuguese immersion teacher at Lakeview Elementary School in Provo City School District in Utah, and as a Portuguese immersion consultant for the Utah State Board of Education. In a letter of support for her, Jamie Leite, the Portuguese Director of the Utah Dual Language Immersion Program, wrote, “In her roles of teacher and teacher leader, I have seen Lili do more to impact the instruction of K-12 Portuguese than any other teacher in the U.S. Her teaching has changed the lives of hundreds of her own students while her curriculum work and leadership has impacted thousands more across the country.”

Among Jaime Leite’s litany of praise for Lili’s teaching, she added, “it is Lili’s daily commitment to her students that is her first priority and deepest passion. She sees her job as teacher as an opportunity to open the minds of her students and help them appreciate the contributions of Portuguese-speaking countries worldwide, particularly her native country of Brazil. Lili’s classroom is a little piece of Brazil in the middle of Provo, Utah and her students often comment that they forget they are in the United States when they are in her class.”

The sentiment that Lili goes above and beyond in helping her students understand not just the language, but the culture of Brazil, was further bolstered in a letter of support offered by Dr. Jaime Bateman of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Brigham Young University. As Jaime Bateman writes, “Beyond the regular curriculum, Lili finds myriad ways of incorporating Brazilian culture in her teaching. She meticulously follows the recommendation of the foreign language teaching profession that classrooms should be ‘cultural islands’ where, when students enter, they immediately feel they are in a different cultural space.”

Inasmuch as CLASP must rely on letters of support in order to understand how nominees have impacted their students, schools, and communities, so, too, does CLASP turn to the personal words of the nominee to learn more about their approach to work and their dedication to bringing Latin America to their students. In particular, the committee was moved by Lili’s depth of personal commitment. In describing her approach, Lili writes, “I am grateful for the opportunity to share my culture and language with my students as I teach the core curriculum. It is impossible to describe in words the feeling of love I feel every day watching my students communicating in Portuguese, learning my culture, gaining proficiency, and sounding exactly like a ‘Brazilian kid.’ This makes my everyday job in the classroom a real joy. Helping students become bilingual, biliterate, and bicultural; contributing to the world as global citizens or, as one would, multilingual and multicultural citizens of the world is one of my everyday missions as a teacher.”

In all, the CLASP Outreach Committee was profoundly moved by Lili’s commitment to teaching about Latin America through the lens of Brazil. In meeting the criteria for the award, she thoroughly demonstrated outstanding teaching effectiveness, innovation and creativity in the presentation of Latin American content, and involvement in professional development and community engagement.

CLASP member institutions nominate teachers for consideration. Lili was nominated by Dr. Claudio Holzner of the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) at the University of Utah.

The awards are administered by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) and decided by the CLASP Outreach Committee, which was comprised of the following individuals in 2018: Lindsey Engelman, University of Texas at Austin (chair); Molly Aufdermauer, Stanford University; Karen Goldman, University of Pittsburgh; Luciano Marzulli, University of Utah; Colleen McCoy, Vanderbilt University; Keira Philipp-Schnurer, University of New Mexico; Diana Maria Shemenski, University of Pittsburgh; and Denise Woltering-Vargas, Tulane University.

CLASP’s mission is to promote all facets of Latin American Studies throughout the world. Its broad range of activities includes the encouragement of research activities, funding for professional workshops, advancement of citizen outreach activities, and development of teaching aids for the classroom.

Public-Engagement-Focus-of-LASA-Outreach-Panel-Latin-America-as-a-Window-to-the-World
JUNE 4TH, 2018

Public Engagement Focus of LASA Outreach Panel: Latin America as a Window to the World

On Friday, May 25, 2018, LASA2018 presented the opportunity for outreach educators from across the US to come together for a CLASP-organized panel focused on “Latin America as a Window to the World: Re-imagining the US Classroom.” Representatives from Stanford University, the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee shared their experiences in working with pre-service and in-service teachers to internationalize curriculum in the K-16 classroom.

Despite the geographic proximity as well as the interdependent nature of Latin America and the U.S., the Latin American region continues to be largely underrepresented in K-12 curriculum throughout the U.S. This panel addresses an ongoing expansion effort to increase Latin American content in U.S. K-12 curriculum and teacher-training, highlighting educational outreach programs that emphasize the importance of Latin American area content and language in understanding diverse issues and processes in societies around the globe. These outreach programs draw on knowledge and expertise from Latin America to inform Latin American Studies and teacher-training programs in the U.S. Presenters will address the revision of history-social science curriculum frameworks, the expansion (conceptual and actual) of world language programs in secondary schools, and the internationalization of pre-service teacher training programs through the use of children’s literature.

A Revised History-Social Science Curriculum Framework: Teaching Latin America in California Schools
Molly Aufdermauer/Elizabeth Sáenz-Ackermann, Stanford University
Contact: mollauf@stanford.edu

In July 2016, the California State Board of Education voted to approve a revised History-Social Science Framework for California Public Schools as part of an effort to help students “learn about the diversity of the state and the contributions of people and groups who may not have received the appropriate recognition in the past” (State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson). This revision added a considerable focus on Latin America. In fall 2016, in an effort to support the teaching of these new themes in the classroom, the Stanford University Center for Latin American Studies partnered with the Stanford Graduate School of Education’s Center to Support Excellence in Teaching and El Colegio de México to develop their first “History of
the Americas” course for teachers of secondary-level history and social-science, with the theme of the Mexican Revolution. In summer 2017, senior scholars from El Colegio de México and San Francisco State University traveled to Stanford to lend their expert knowledge on the Mexican Revolution from both U.S. and Mexico’s perspectives, including the aftermath of the revolution and the politics of nation-building. With the goal of equipping high school instructors to teach and prepare students to understand comparable challenges not only in Latin America but around the globe, both historically and today, the course included excellent content and faculty presentations complemented with an equally strong pedagogy component by teaching experts from Stanford’s Graduate School of Education.

Portuguese as a Global Language: Teaching the Lusosphere through a School-University Partnership
Karen S. Goldman, University of Pittsburgh
Contact: kgoldman@pitt.edu

In the U.S., most universities that offer Portuguese language programs focus on Brazilian Portuguese and the history/cultures of Brazil. Occasionally, there is attention to the language as it is spoken in Portugal, generally as a point of comparison. In March 2017, the University of Pittsburgh held its first annual seminar on cultures of the Lusosphere, aiming to educate participants on cultural identities of diverse countries, regions, states or cities where people speak Portuguese: Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Portugal, São Tomé and Príncipe, Macau, East Timor and various communities around the world, including southern Florida and New England, USA. This focus on Portuguese as a global language has been extended through the outreach program of the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) to the high school students in the Pittsburgh Public School District. The presence of Portuguese as a world language in the public school curriculum in Pittsburgh, a city with a miniscule Portuguese-speaking community, is a direct result of CLAS’s “Portuguese: Language of the Future” Program, which provides Portuguese language training to Spanish teachers, who incorporate the language and Lusophone studies into curriculum. This partnership provides opportunities for high school students to learn about the Lusosphere, including watching films and television, attending cultural events and having access to native speakers and authentic materials. The focus on the Lusosphere also lends itself to understanding of world history, in particular as it relates to the Atlantic Slave trade and the current demographic configuration of Brazil.

Reading Latin America: Internationalizing an Introduction to Children’s Literature Course for Pre-Service Teachers
Julie Kline, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Contact: jkline@uwm.edu
The UW-Milwaukee Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies is partnering with UWM School of Education faculty and staff during the 2017-18 academic year to internationalize the basic Introduction to Children’s Literature course required for all students in early childhood and middle childhood/early adolescent programs (5 sections, 125 students/semester). Drawing largely from the CLASP Américas Award and related resources, the presentation will: 1) highlight the potential of linking children’s literature theme, genre and author study to Latin American content; 2) emphasize giving students the opportunity to see themselves and their cultures in books; and 3) model the transferability of the project to core pre-service teacher training at any School of Education.

2018-Amricas-Award-Winners-Announced
MAY 25TH, 2018

2018 Américas Award Winners Announced

Barcelona, Spain—May 25, 2018—American Street written by Ibi Zoboi and DANZA!: Amalia Hernández and el Ballet Folklórico de México written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh win the 2018 Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature. The award links the Americas by reaching beyond geographic borders and multicultural-international boundaries, focusing upon cultural heritages within the hemisphere.

Up to two annual book awards are given in recognition of U.S. published works that authentically and engagingly portray Latin America, the Caribbean, or Latinos in the United States. An additional two titles may be recognized as Honorable Mentions, along with a list of Commended Titles. Books are considered for their distinctive literary quality, cultural contextualization, integration of text and illustration, and potential for classroom use.

The announcement was made today by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) during the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) meeting held May 23-26, 2018, in Barcelona, Spain. The award-winning authors will be recognized at a ceremony held September 28, 2018, during Hispanic Heritage Month at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

Members of the 2018 Américas Award Selection Committee include David Campos of San Antonio, TX; Emily Chávez of Durham, NC; Paula Mason of Waukesha, WI (chairperson); Mariana Ricklefs of Dunlap, Illinois; and Connie Sharp of Nashville, TN.

The awards are administered by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) and coordinated by both Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies. Generous support is also provided by Florida International University, Stanford University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Utah, and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

CLASP’s mission is to promote all facets of Latin American Studies throughout the world. Its broad range of activities include the encouragement of research activities, funding for professional workshops, advancement of citizen outreach activities, and development of teaching aids for the classroom. For complete annotations of all titles recognized by the Américas Award, as well as curricular resources for previous winning titles, visit www.claspprograms.org/americasaward. Follow the Américas Award on Facebook at www.facebook.com/americasaward for current news and author highlights, and join the conversation using #AmericasAward18.

APRIL 3RD, 2018

Call to Action: CLASP Puerto Rico Task Force Survey

CLASP is gathering information on existing and potential development of collaborations with the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) post-Hurricane María. UPR is Puerto Rico’s main public university and a long-standing partner with universities and research institutions in the US and Latin America. Our goal is to affirm our support to Puerto Rican scholars and assist them in the rebuilding process of the university by (1) disseminating information on academic resources available to them in the US; (2) establishing sustainable collaborations and exchanges; and (3) identifying potential outreach projects of interest to UPR partners and the wider Puerto Rican community. Please be aware that the results of this survey will be shared with UPR administration and partners.

The survey should not take longer than 10 minutes. Please feel free to share the link with other area-studies centers and academic institutions that might be interested in collaborating. For further information, please contact Lenny A. Ureña Valerio at lurenavalerio@latam.ufl.edu or Beatriz Riefkohl at riefkohl@email.unc.edu.

Link to survey: https://goo.gl/forms/bkWp75eRBdAjI0G83

MARCH 21ST, 2018

CLASP Teaching Award for K–12 Educators - Extended Deadline (April 16)

In 2018 the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) calls for nominations for its fifth annual “CLASP Teaching Award for K–12 Educators.” The award was established to recognize excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and/or the Caribbean among elementary, middle, and high school teachers. CLASP proudly honors teachers who have displayed continued dedication to presenting their students with an engaging and dynamic portrait of Latin America that goes beyond the textbook.

Nominations should come from CLASP member institutions; both faculty and administrators may submit a nomination, although only one nomination may be submitted per institution.

Procedures for Nomination

Please include the following:
1.) A 1–2-page letter from the nominator providing clear and convincing evidence of the following:
a.) Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including teaching methods and student successes stories
b.) Innovation/creativity in the presentation of Latin American content
c.) Involvement in professional development and/or community engagement related to Latin America (i.e., the nominee seeks opportunities to learn about/engage with the region).

2.) Supporting information from the nominees, including:
a.) Résumé
b.) Evidence of how they have integrated Latin American content into their classes, including their approach to the teaching of Latin America and how it has helped students attain the goals of the class (1–2 pages)
c.) One letter of support from a colleague (peer or supervisor) who can attest to the nature of the nominee’s work in the classroom
d.) Other documentation (e.g., excerpts from the lesson, student work, professional development presentation), as appropriate.

Applicants should be advised that their name, email address, and school affiliation may be entered in a CLASP directory of K-12 educators and their curriculum materials incorporated into a CLASP database of K-12 resources. Both the directory and database will be made available to CLASP members with the intention of developing a nationwide network of K-12 educators and resources. The applicants themselves may also be added to a listserv related to this initiative, which would facilitate direct resource sharing and collaboration with their colleagues across the country.

Applications will be reviewed and evaluated for teaching skills, development of innovative teaching materials and strategies, leadership, and professional development accomplishments. Nominations will be accepted through April 16, 2018 (deadline extended).

Please email the nomination materials to Lindsey Engelman, Outreach Committee Chair, at lengelman@austin.utexas.edu.

The winner will be announced during the 2018 LASA conference and will be awarded a $500 cash prize.

CLASP-Task-Force-to-Support-Educational-Partners-in-Puerto-Rico
MARCH 15TH, 2018

CLASP Task Force to Support Educational Partners in Puerto Rico

Help CLASP Support Our Educational Partners in Puerto Rico

In response to the devastating impact of Hurricane Maria on primary, secondary and post-secondary educational institutions in Puerto Rico, CLASP has established a task force to support our partners throughout the island. As part of a partnership network, CLASP task force members are consulting with institutional leaders and relief organizations in Puerto Rico to prioritize areas for resource sharing, compiling information on CLASP member institutions’ efforts to provide scholar and student support, and brokering new partnerships for long-term collaboration and exchange between CLASP member institutions and our colleagues in Puerto Rico.

Contact CLASP Puerto Rico Task Force Co-Chairs for more information:
Lenny Urena, University of Florida <lurenavalerio@latam.ufl.edu>
Beatriz Riefkohl Muniz, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill <riefkohl@email.unc.edu>

Amricas-Award-Part-of-Webinar-Series-for-K-12-Teachers
FEBRUARY 8TH, 2018

Américas Award Part of Webinar Series for K-12 Teachers

Reading Across Cultures Webinar Series: Social Justice

Once a month, the World Area Book Awards (Américas Award, Africana Book Award, Middle East Book Award, South Asia Book Award) sponsor a free 60 minute webinar on a book recognized by one of the awards and facilitate a discussion with the author on how to incorporate the book into the classroom. The 2018 Spring Webinar Series focuses on social justice. We encourage educators to read the books with your colleagues, students, and community, and then join us to hear more from the author.

On Thursday, February 8, 2018, join us for a 60 minute webinar/chat to explore the diversity of Cuba with award winning author, Margarita Engle. Engle, the national Young People’s Poet Laureate will discuss her book Lion Island: Cuba’s Warrior of Words and share teaching and discussion ideas to explore the story of Antonio Chuffat, a young man of African, Chinese, and Cuban descent who becomes a champion for civil rights.

Link to webinar will be emailed to you once you register here.

Be sure to join the conversation with our webinar hashtag #2018ReadingAcrossCultures. All sessions are free and open to the public. All times listed refer to Central Standard Time (CST). Sponsored by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs, the South Asia National Outreach Consortium, the Middle East Outreach Council, and Africa Access.

For more information about the webinar series, please visit the Internationalizing Social Studies website.

JANUARY 29TH, 2018

Still Time to Renew Your CLASP Membership for 2018!

Greetings from CLASP!

There is still time to renew your CLASP Membership for 2018. Your dues contribute to a number of events and projects, most notably the CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty, the CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators, and especially the Americas Award for Children’s and Juvenile Literature. Over the past year, CLASP supported sessions at a variety of regional Latin American Studies meetings and came together to promote the work of members institutions at conferences throughout the US. In addition to resource-sharing via the CLASP Listserv, CLASP membership also grants access to a variety of professional resources designed to support continued growth of Latin American Studies programs across the globe, including, but not limited to course syllabi, curricula, grant proposals, and research publications.

If you have questions regarding your membership, please email CLASP Secretary/Treasurer, Valerie McGinley, at <vmcgmar@tulane.edu>. If you have questions about your subscription to the CLASP Listserv <listserv@claspprograms.org> OR access to the Resources page of the CLASP Website <http://www.claspprograms.org/pages/detail/9/Member-Resources>, please contact Liesl Picard, CLASP Publications Chair, at <picardl@fiu.edu>.

PLEASE RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP BY APRIL 15, 2018.

DECEMBER 6TH, 2017

Educators Connect with CLASP at National Educator Conferences in San Francisco and St. Louis

San Francisco, CA National Council for the Social Studies
San Francisco was buzzing with excitement with thousands of Social Studies educators this past November 17 – 19, 2017 at the annual National Council for the Social Studies conference. Representatives from the CLASP Outreach Committee were right there in the middle of the buzz engaging educators in conversations about teaching Latin America.

This year, CLASP once again sponsored an exhibit booth and distributed our CLASP tote bags filled with teaching resources from our centers along with special materials produced by Outreach Chair, Keira Philipp-Schnurer (CLASP Teaching Resources and Américas Award for Social Studies Flyer). CLASP was there representing resources on Latin America with many others in the International Alley of the NCSS exhibit hall. The NCSS reported a total of 3,404 teachers registered at this year’s conference held in the Moscone Center in downtown San Francisco. CLASP representatives engaged with about 200 – 300 of those educators.

Sponsors of this year’s booth include Florida International University, Stanford University, Tulane University, the University of Chicago, the University of Florida, the University of New Mexico, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Utah, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and Vanderbilt University. Thanks to Stanford University’s Molly Aufdermauer and Elizabeth Saenz-Ackermann who helped to connect CLASP representatives in town and handle a bulk of the material load up. Also, we are very grateful for the help staffing the booth from Molly Aufdermauer, University of New Mexico’s Keira Philipp-Schnurer, Chair of the Outreach Committee, University of Pittsburgh’s Karen Goldman and Diana Shemenski, University of Texas’ Lindsey Engelman, and Vanderbilt’s Colleen McCoy.

We are looking forward to next year’s conference in Chicago!

St. Louis, MO National Council for the Teachers of English
CLASP sponsored former Américas Award committee member and associate professor of Reading & Language at National Louis University, Ruth Quiroa at the annual National Council for the Teachers of English conference (NCTE) in St. Louis, MO this past November. Quiroa presented on a panel with a presentation entitled Immigration in the Américas: Of Dividing Distances, Discrimination, and Dreamers. This conference among others (ILA, USBBY, the National Latino Children’s Literature Conference and many others) are excellent places to engage educators and librarians with Américas Award books. If you work with and/or present on the Américas Award at a national conference, please let Américas Award Co-coordinators Colleen McCoy, Vanderbilt University and Denise Woltering-Vargas, Tulane University know so we can share the information.

NOVEMBER 20TH, 2017

Call for Nominations for the 2018 CLASP Junior Faculty Teaching Award for Professors

The Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) calls for nominations for its sixth annual “CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty.” The award recognizes excellence in teaching Latin American Studies designated courses. Tenured faculty members are not eligible. Nominees in a tenure-track position are preferred, but visiting or adjunct professors and instructors are eligible. Nominees must have the Ph.D., and they must be currently teaching at a CLASP member institution. Nominations should come from senior or supervising faculty or administrators. The nominator should provide clear and convincing evidence of the following in a letter of no more than 600 words:

1. Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including pedagogical style and student successes stories.
2. Contributions to the Latin American Studies program and the Department.
3. Involvement in the greater community, including professional associations and participation in service activities.
4. Incorporation of own academic research and field experiences into the classroom.

The nominees will be asked to provide a Statement of Teaching Philosophy and a current CV. The CLASP Teaching Committee and former winners will evaluate the nominations and will recommend three finalists to the CLASP Executive Committee. The finalists will then be asked to provide the contact information of two current or former students, and these students will be asked to provide evidence of teaching effectiveness in a recommendation letter. Nominations will be accepted through Friday, February 9th, 2018.

Please email the nomination letter to: vgawrons@bsc.edu

The winner will be presented with an engraved trophy and a check for $500 at either the 2018 Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies Conference (March 8th-11th) or the Latin American Studies Association International Congress (May 23rd-26th).

CLASP-Executive-Committee-Meeting-Hosted-by-Stanford-University
OCTOBER 30TH, 2017

CLASP Executive Committee Meeting Hosted by Stanford University

CLASP member institution Stanford University welcomed the CLASP Executive Committee (EC) for its Fall 2017 meeting from October 26-27, 2017. EC minutes from the Lima, Peru meeting were approved, CLASP financial reports were reviewed and approved, CLASP committee reports were presented, and new business proposals were put forth for consideration. Discussions also focused on strategies to increase CLASP membership among liberal arts and teaching colleges, as well as CLASP’s impact and long-term planning to ensure the continued growth in the areas of new training opportunities, collaboration and exchange during regional Latin American Studies conferences, and CLASP presence at the upcoming LASA conference in Barcelona, Spain.

OCTOBER 20TH, 2017

Exploring Diverse Roots of Migration with the Américas Award

In September, the Américas Award explored diverse roots of migration found in the Américas Award books through programs in Washington, D.C.

CLASP awarded the 2017 Américas Award to Susan Hood and Sally Wern Comport for their work, Ada’s Violin (Simon & Schuster) and Alexandra Diaz for The Only Road (Simon & Schuster) on September 22, 2017 in front of 75 people at the Whittall Pavilion in the Library of Congress. The Library of Congress’ Hispanic Division and the Center for the Book co-sponsored the program. CLASP also recognized Nadia L. Hohn, author of Malaika’s Costume (Groundwood Books) and Reyna Grande, author of The Distance Between Us, for their honorable mention titles.

The annual Américas Award professional development workshop for K-16 educators, “Exploring the Diverse Roots of Migration in Latin America & the Caribbean” was attended by 36 participants, both friends of the Américas award and K-16 educators. This workshop, organized in collaboration with and hosted by American University on September 21, brought together educators from around the DC area to engage with authors Alexandra Diaz, Reyna Grande, and Nadia L. Hohn. Presentations were also made by educator and curriculum specialist Rebeca Gamez of the Johns Hopkins School of Education, and Coordinator of Teacher Engagement and Professional Development of Teaching for Change, Fayette Colon. Participants in the workshop brought home signed copies of 2017 award winner The Only Road and honorable mention titles The Distance Between Us and Malaika’s Costume. Sixteen workshop participants were new to the Américas award. A CLASP approved curriculum is currently being developed for The Only Road by The University of New Mexico. When available, the resource will be posted on the CLASP website.

Pre and post surveys were conducted and report a high level of satisfaction with the workshop. The data reports that the workshop increased participants’ comfort levels in facilitating conversations about diversity in the classroom, as well as their familiarity with the Américas Book Award. On average, the participants found the workshop very useful for content, curriculum building, and networking. Participants commented on the “really fantastic presentations” and the “very informative” nature of the evening.

One participant expressed, “This was the best, most useful teacher workshop I have attended!” and was particularly pleased with how the authors presented ways to best teach their books in the classroom.

“This was my first time attending. It was very informative and I enjoyed networking with other content teachers,” said another participant.

School Visits
Both award-winning authors, Susan Hood and Alexandra Diaz made school visits prior to the award ceremony. Thanks to our continued partnership with An Open Book Foundation, Alexandra visited 85 students at Wheaton High School in Montgomery County, MD, while Susan visited with 42 third-grade students at Mount Rainier Elementary School in Prince George’s County. Hood’s book was presented within both the music and language arts classes, making deep cross-curricular connections.

An Open Book Foundation also distributed more than 90 copies of The Only Road at Wheaton and 59 copies of Ada’s Violin (including both English and Spanish versions) at Mount Rainier.

The 2017 Américas Award is made possible by these important sponsors Florida International University, Stanford University, Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Utah, and the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee.

Follow the Américas Award on Facebook or join the Américas listserv by sending an email to claspprograms@gmail.com

The Call for Submissions for the 2018 Américas Award is circulating and the review committee members are already busy reading submissions for this year’s competition. Decisions will be made by April and the ceremony will be held during Hispanic Heritage Month Fall 2018 in Washington, D.C.

CLASP-Celebrates-Hispanic-Heritage-in-Washington
AUGUST 21ST, 2017

CLASP Celebrates Hispanic Heritage in Washington

The Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) will bring exciting programs for all during the 2017 Hispanic Heritage month. CLASP will celebrate Latin America in some of the country’s most important libraries. From the Library of Congress to George Washington’s library at Mt. Vernon, CLASP engages educators and the community in the diversity of Latin America this fall. Read more about our programs below.

September 20 – 22, 2017

International Baccalaureate Educator Workshop
CLASP will co-sponsor a professional development workshop day for International Baccalaureate teachers in Fairfax County, Virginia on September 20, 2017. Organized by Julie Kline (Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) the workshop features presentations by three outstanding historians: Paula Alonso (George Washington University); Bryan Mc Cann (Georgetown University); and John Tutino (Georgetown University). The presenters will highlight three different historical periods (independence, late nineteenth-early twentieth century, post-WWII) each viewed through a different country lens (Mexico, Argentina, Brazil).

The workshop, to be held at the Fred W. Smith Library for the Study of George Washington adjacent to Mount Vernon, will also include sessions on the Smith Library’s resources and on resources for teaching Latin America and the Caribbean by outreach professionals from Title VI National Resource Centers, including UW-Milwaukee, Tulane University, and Vanderbilt University). In addition to Fairfax County IB teachers, IB educators from throughout Virginia are invited, as well as from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and the District of Columbia. Organizers anticipate approximately 35 educators.

Américas Award Educator Workshop
On Thursday, September 21 CLASP will hold its annual Américas Award K-12 educator workshop this year hosted by American University’s School of Education. The workshop will highlight three Américas Award books that portray different perspectives of migration. Award winner, Alexandra Díaz will present her book, The Only Road, honorable mention author, Reyna Grande will share her story of migration from the book The Distance Between Us, and Nadia Hohn will highlight a different story of migration from the Caribbean in her honorable mention book, Malaika’s Costume. In addition, curriculum specialist, Rebeca Gamez will integrate unique strategies to incorporate these themes into the classroom. Teaching for Change will help to sponsor this program. Fayette Colon from this non-profit educational organization will be part of our program to help share additional teaching resources for participants. Print the workshop flyer here.

Américas Award Ceremony
This year’s Américas Award ceremony will be held in the Whittall Pavilion in the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress on Friday, September 22. We will award the 2017 award winners and honorable mention authors. The ceremony will be held at 2:30 pm and will be followed by a light reception. Please join us and celebrate this year’s award with winners Susan Hood, and Sally Wern Comport for their book Ada’s Violin (Simon & Schuster) and Alexandra Díaz for The Only Road (Simon & Schuster). We will also highlight honorable mention authors, Nadia Hohn for Malaika’s Costume (Groundwood Books) and Reyna Grande for The Distance Between Us (Simon & Schuster).

The Américas Award is sponsored by CLASP and coordinated by Denise Woltering-Vargas (Tulane University) and Colleen McCoy (Vanderbilt University) with generous support provided by Florida International University, Stanford University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Utah, and the University of Wisconsin –Milwaukee.

Follow the latest updates on the Américas Award on Facebook.

This Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 – October 15), make sure to check out CLASP’s Outreach page to discover teaching materials you can use in your classroom to teach about Latin America. If you are interested in attending any of these programs or being involved in CLASP, please email CLASPprograms@gmail.com.

MAY 11TH, 2017

Anne Moctezuma-Baker Winner of 2017 Teaching Award for K-12 Educators

In 2014, CLASP established the CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators to recognize excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and/or the Caribbean among elementary, middle, and high school teachers. “Each year the award process highlights exceptional educators from the across the country and brings to light inspiring teaching practices,” said Keira Philipp-Schnurer, chair of the CLASP Outreach Committee.

From among the outstanding teachers nominated in 2017, CLASP recognizes Anne Moctezuma-Baker as the winner of the CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators. The award was publicly announced April 29, 2017, at the 51st International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association in Lima, Peru.

Moctezuma-Baker has taught Spanish for five years at Martin Luther King Jr. Academic Magnet School in Nashville, Tennessee, a public school nationally recognized for academic achievement. In nominating Moctezuma-Baker for this award, Lisa Finelli, Outreach Coordinator at the Center for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt University, observed that “Anne is set apart as an impressive educator with an undeniable dedication to infusing Latin American culture in her classroom and community. She certainly goes beyond the textbook by seeking a variety of opportunities to weave Latin America into her classroom through music, dance, cultural activities, and opportunities. Anne’s student, Jalisa, states that she credits Ms. Moctezuma for not only helping her learn but experience Latin American culture right in the classroom.”

This depth and richness of teaching can be traced, according to Moctezuma-Baker, to her roots in Mexico, where she was born and where she lived for sixteen years. And while she self-admittedly draws on her personal experiences to enrich the classroom experience for her students, she also acknowledges the diversity of Latin American perspectives and voices by inviting other Latin American speakers into her classroom.

The CLASP Outreach Committee, upon learning of Moctezuma-Baker’s extensive work within and beyond her classroom, were as impressed as Finelli by Moctezuma-Baker’s exceptional dedication to bringing Latin American culture and history to her students. As committee member Lindsey Engelman (Public Engagement Coordinator, University of Texas at Austin) noted, “Some of the many ways she does this is incorporating her own experiences living in Mexico into daily conversations in the classroom, exploring Latin American culture through art and literature, and bringing in speakers from all different parts of Latin America to share knowledge with her students. Additionally, the committee was impressed by Anne’s great efforts to share Latin American culture with the entire school, such as putting on Day of the Dead and Hispanic Heritage Month activities for the school and starting a Latin American dance club — activities that promote cultural awareness and understanding about Latin America beyond the classroom walls.”

CLASP member institutions nominate teachers for consideration of the award. Moctezuma-Baker was nominated by Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies.

The awards are administered by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) and decided by the CLASP Outreach Committee, which was comprised of the following individuals in 2017: Keira Philipp-Schnurer, University of New Mexico (chair); Molly Aufdermauer, Stanford University; Emily Chávez, UNC-Duke Consortium in Latin American Studies; Lindsey Engelman, University of Texas at Austin; Lisa Finelli, Vanderbilt University; Karen Goldman, University of Pittsburgh; Luciano Marzulli, University of Utah; Alfio Saitto of Indiana University-Bloomington; and Denise Woltering-Vargas, Tulane University.

CLASP’s mission is to promote all facets of Latin American Studies throughout the world. Its broad range of activities includes the encouragement of research activities, funding for professional workshops, advancement of citizen outreach activities, and development of teaching aids for the classroom.

2017-Amricas-Award-Winners-Announced-
MAY 1ST, 2017

2017 Américas Award Winners Announced

Susan Hood and Sally Wern Comport author and illustrator of Ada’s Violin and Alexandra Diaz, author of The Only Road win the 2017 Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature.The award links the Americas by reaching beyond geographic borders and multicultural-international boundaries, focusing upon cultural heritages within the hemisphere.

Up to two annual book awards are given in recognition of U.S. published works that authentically and engagingly portray Latin America, the Caribbean, or Latinos in the United States. An additional two titles may be recognized as Honorable Mentions, along with a list of Commended Titles. Books are considered for their distinctive literary quality, cultural contextualization, integration of text and illustration, and potential for classroom use.

The announcement was made yesterday by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) during the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) meeting held April 29 – May 1, 2017 in Lima, Peru. Please watch the short video announcement. The award-winning authors will be recognized at a ceremony held September 22, 2017 during Hispanic Heritage Month, at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

Members of the 2017 Américas Award Selection Committee include David Campos of San Antonio, TX; Emily Chávez of Durham, NC; Denise Croker of Nashville, TN; Paula Mason of Waukesha, WI; and Maria Sheldon of Santa Fe, NM.

The awards are administered by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) and coordinated by Vanderbilt University Center for Latin American Studies and Tulane University Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Generous support is also provided by Florida International University, Stanford University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and the University of Utah.

CLASP’s mission is to promote all facets of Latin American Studies throughout the world. Its broad range of activities include the encouragement of research activities, funding for professional workshops, advancement of citizen outreach activities, and development of teaching aids for the classroom. For complete annotations of all titles recognized by the Américas Award, as well as curricular resources for previous winning titles, visit www.claspprograms.org/americasaward. Follow the Américas Award on Facebook for current news and author highlights, and join the conversation using #AmericasAward17.

Award Winners

Ada’s Violin written by Susan Hood and illustrated by Sally Wern Comport. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2016. ISBN: 978-1481-430-951
The Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay has received international attention because of the extraordinary story of the children living in Cateura, home of the main garbage dump for the capital city of Asunciόn and how they became musicians using instruments made of recycled trash. Many of the townspeople work in the landfill earning as little as two dollars a day. Before the arrival of a consultant engineer to the landfill (Favio Chavez, who happened to be a musician), many of the children had no creative outlets and their futures seemed bleak. Ada’s Violin conveys the beautiful story of a young girl, Ada Rios, whose grandmother signs her up to learn how to play the violin through lessons given by Chavez. When there are more children interested in learning about music than there are instruments, Chavez turns to a local carpenter who begins to make instruments from recycled trash. At last, there are enough instruments for the children. Through diligent practice they develop the expertise to perform concerts for the local community. Their orchestra becomes so good, in fact, that they begin to perform in countries around the world. Coupled with magnificent illustrations, the author provides readers a background on the story, and website and videos links that teachers can use for extension activities, including a web address for how readers can help the orchestra. (Grades K-3)

The Only Road written by Alexandra Diaz. Simon & Schuster, 2016. ISBN: 978-1481457507
The Only Road describes the journey of a teenage boy, Jamie, and his cousin Angela traveling from their hometown in Guatemala to the United States. Author Alexandra Diaz illustrates the many obstacles, uncertainties, hopes, fears, and unexpected blessings that shape the teens’ migration in a way that is both honest and sensitive to its intended young adult audience. This is without a doubt an empathy-building novel. Being able to accompany the main characters through their harsh and humbling trek allows the reader to get a glimpse into what tens of thousands of Central American youth have experienced in recent years. The characters themselves also demonstrate a remarkable courage and humility, often observing the sacrifices that were made for them and acknowledging the even more dangerous and devastating hardships faced by others they meet along the way. Yet Jamie and Angela are not one-dimensional by any means; they are teenagers with human emotions, needs and curiosities. They struggle with each other and with themselves. The sensory-rich prose of this novel allows the reader to be right there with the characters—as they travel hidden in the back of a pickup truck, ride on the notorious bestia, sleep on the floor of a safe house and, through it all, keep going. Classroom discussion on important contemporary issues and universal questions is invited through the many moving events of this story, such as: What happens when life forces one to travel “the only road?” This book also contains a Spanish/English glossary and suggestions for further reading for youth and adults. (Grades 7-10)

Honorable Mention

Malaika’s Costume written by Nadia L. Hohn and illustrated by Irene Luxbacher. Groundwood Books, 2016. ISBN: 978-1554987542
In Nadia Hohn’s touching and timely picture book, we are introduced to Malaika, a young girl living at home with her Grandma in the Caribbean while her mother is working far away in icebox-like Canada to provide a better life for her family. Told in distinctive Caribbean patois, Malaika’s voice genuinely rings out to the reader, as she describes both her excitement about the upcoming Carnival celebrations, and her feelings of sadness and disappointment in missing her mother on this special holiday. Accompanied by colorful collage-style illustrations by Irene Luxbacher that bring Malaika’s island home alive, the reader is introduced to the costumes and characters of Carnival. There are also numerous significant visual details to catch a young reader’s eye, such as drawings presumably from Malaika herself that provide a window into her emotional state throughout the story. Moreover, Luxbacher does a magnificent job of displaying tender emotion in the expressions of Malaika and her Grandma, adding an even deeper richness to the story. We watch Malaika, with her Grandma’s support, transform an old dusty costume into a bright and beautiful peacock costume. In the process, we witness her emerge as a “shiny and proud and strong” version of herself in the Carnival parade. Hohn’s demonstrates a deft, expert touch in handling challenging topics such as family separation and immigration in a way that speaks sincerely to young readers while presenting a tale of vibrant strength, ingenuity and spirit. (Grades K-3)

The Distance Between Us written by Reyna Grande. Aladdin, Simon & Schuster, 2016. ISBN: 978-1481463713
This memoir is the story of Reyna Grande’s journey from childhood in Mexico to becoming an American college graduate and accomplished author. This story beautifully captures what children who are left behind in Mexico experience as they long to be reunited with their parents who–ironically–have left their homeland to make a better life for them. Grande gracefully reflects on the love she had for her father who had left his family to cross over to the U.S., and recalls the ocean of emotions she experienced when she came to learn that her mother, too, was leaving. She candidly describes how she and her siblings were left under the care of her paternal grandmother who was harsh, and treated them as a burden and nuisance rather than the loving grandchildren they were. Holding true to his promise, her father returns nearly eight years later to cross his children into the United States. Grande does not hold back describing the discord in her life living in Los Angeles under the household of a loving, albeit abusive father. Many readers will be able to identify with themes of the book: loving parents who want the best for their children but at costs that are severe; the struggle to fit in at school while being undocumented and not knowing English; and the power of perseverance despite setbacks that are seemingly unfair. This book proves an engaging read. Grande includes a variety of photos of her family and of important milestones which make the memoir all the more enduring. (Grades 5-9)

Commended Titles

Burn Baby Burn written by Meg Medina. Candlewick Press, 2016. ISBN: 978-0763674670

Juana & Lucas written by Juana Medina. Candlewick Press, 2016. ISBN: 978-0763672089

Lion Island written by Margarita Engle. Simon & Schuster, 2016. ISBN: 978-1481461122

Lowriders to the Center of the Earth written by Cathy Camper and illustrated by Raúl the Third. Chronicle Books, 2016. ISBN: 978-1452123431

Mamá the Alien / Mamá la extraterrestre written by René Colato Laínez and illustrated by Laura Lacámara. Children’s Book Press, Lee & Low Books, 2016. ISBN: 978-0892392988

Margarito’s Forest / El Bosque de Don Margarito written by Andy Carter and illustrated by Allison Havens. Hard Ball Press, 2016. ISBN: 978-0997979701

Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat written by Javaka Steptoe. Hachette Book Group, 2016. ISBN: 978-0316213882

Rainbow Weaver – Tejedora del arcoirís written by Linda Elovitz Marshall and illustrated by Elisa Chavarri. Children’s Book Press, Lee & Low Books, 2016. ISBN: 978-0892393749

Shame the Stars written by Guadalupe García McCall. Lee & Low Books, 2016. ISBN: 978-1620142783

Somos como las nubes / We are Like the Clouds written by Jorge Argueta and illustrated by Alfonso Ruano. Groundwood Books, 2016. ISBN: 978-1554988495

The Memory of Light written by Francisco X. Stork. Arthur A. Levine Books, Scholastic, 2016. ISBN: 978-0545474320

The Princess and the Warrior written Duncan Tonatiuh. Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2016. ISBN: 978-1419721304

The School the Aztec Eagles Built written by Dorinda Makanaōnalani Nicholson. Lee & Low Books, 2016. ISBN: 978-1600604409

APRIL 30TH, 2017

CLASP Congratulates Michelle C. Wibbelsman

Winner of the 2017 Junior Faculty Teaching Award
Assistant Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese
The Ohio State University

Join-CLASP-at-LASA2017
APRIL 24TH, 2017

Join CLASP at LASA2017

In its role as a leader in the promotion of Latin American studies across the globe, CLASP will once again demonstrate a strong presence at the XXXV International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association (April 29- May 1, 2017 in Lima, Peru). CLASP-related activities include:

CLASP Annual Business Meeting
Saturday, April 29, 2017 | 4:00-5:00pm | PUCP A304

CLASP Outreach Meeting
Saturday, April 29, 2017 | 5:00-5:45pm | PUCP A304

Panel: Confronting Education: Lessons on Afro-Latin American Histories for K-12 Classrooms and Beyond
Sunday, April 30, 2017 | 2:00-3:45pm | PUCP A202

Panel: Creating Equity of Opportunity in Education through Latin American Studies
Monday, May 1, 2017 | 4:00-5:45pm | PUCP A606

FEBRUARY 28TH, 2017

Américas Award Winning Authors Featured in Interviews on Vamos a Leer Blog

Thanks to an exciting CLASP collaboration, Américas Award winning authors and illustrators are appearing in recent interviews on the Vamos a Leer blog, a website dedicated to supporting the teaching of Latin America through literacy and literature.

The collaboration emerged naturally as a result of the ongoing efforts of CLASP Outreach Chair Keira Philipp-Schnurer (Latin American & Iberian Institute, The University of New Mexico) and Américas Award Coordinator Denise Woltering-Vargas (Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Tulane University), who have worked closely together over the last few years to expand the reach of the Américas Award.

The Vamos a Leer blog frequently highlights the exceptional children’s and young adult (YA) literature produced by Américas Award winning authors and illustrators, but in Fall 2016 this effort expanded to include an ongoing series of one-on-one interviews with Américas Award recipients. The interviews invite award winners to discuss their perspectives on the current relevance of their work and how it fits within the context of teaching about Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latino cultures in K-12 classrooms and the community. Interviewees have also responded to the broader social and political climate by offering words of encouragement and advice for K-12 educators who seek to create supportive, diverse classroom environments.

Recent interviews have highlighted the work of Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy, and Margarita Engle. The interviews will continue throughout the spring and beyond, bringing with them the opportunity to broaden teachers’ perspectives on the importance of providing students with authentic, engaging, and meaningful multicultural literature.

We encourage you to learn more about the interviews and related resources by visiting the Vamos a Leer blog or to learn more about the Américas Award and related resources by visiting the award page.

JANUARY 29TH, 2017

Extended Deadline and Revised Requirements for Nominations for K-12 Teaching Award

UPDATE:
Please take note of an extended deadline (now March 17, 2017) and revised requirements for the 2017 K-12 Teaching Award. Nominees are no longer required to submit a letter of recommendation from a supervisor, and are instead invited to submit letters of recommendation from any professional peer who can speak to the significance of the nominee’s work in the classroom.

In 2017 the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) calls for nominations for its fourth annual “CLASP Teaching Award for K–12 Educators.” The award was established to recognize excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and/or the Caribbean among elementary, middle, and high school teachers. CLASP proudly honors teachers who have displayed continued dedication to presenting their students with an engaging and dynamic portrait of Latin America that goes beyond the textbook.

Nominations should come from CLASP member institutions; both faculty and administrators may submit a nomination, although only one nomination may be submitted per institution. Nominees do not have to teach at a CLASP member institution.

Procedures for Nomination
Please include the following:
(1) A 1–2-page letter from the nominator providing clear and convincing evidence of the following:
(a) Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including teaching methods and student successes stories
(b) Innovation/creativity in the presentation of Latin American content
© Involvement in professional development and/or community engagement related to Latin America (i.e., the nominee seeks opportunities to learn about/engage with the region).

(2) Supporting information from the nominees, including:
(a) Résumé
(b) Evidence of how they have integrated Latin American content into their classes, including their approach to the teaching of Latin America and how it has helped students attain the goals of the class (1–2 pages)
© One letter of support from a colleague (peer or supervisor) who can attest to the nature of the nominee’s work in the classroom
(d) Other documentation (e.g., excerpts from the lesson, student work, professional development presentation), as appropriate.

Applicants should be advised that their name, email address, and school affiliation may be entered in a CLASP directory of K-12 educators and their curriculum materials incorporated into a CLASP database of K-12 resources. Both the directory and database will be made available to CLASP members with the intention of developing a nationwide network of K-12 educators and resources. The applicants themselves may also be added to a listserv related to this initiative, which would facilitate direct resource sharing and collaboration with their colleagues across the country.

Applications will be reviewed and evaluated for teaching skills, development of innovative teaching materials and strategies, leadership, and professional development accomplishments. Nominations will be accepted through March 17, 2017 (deadline extended).

Please email the nomination materials to Keira Philipp-Schnurer, Outreach Committee Chair, at kphilipp@unm.edu.

The winner will be announced in late Spring 2017 and will be awarded a $500 cash prize.

CLASP-promotes-Latin-America-related-resources-at-National-Conference-for-Social-Studies
NOVEMBER 30TH, 2016

CLASP promotes Latin America-related resources at National Conference for Social Studies

In 2016, CLASP continued a tradition that it has nurtured for over a decade: promoting Latin American Studies resources at the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) annual conference. As the largest association in the country devoted solely to social studies education, NCSS is the umbrella organization for elementary, secondary, and college teachers of history, civics, geography, economics, political science, sociology, psychology, anthropology, and law-related education. Its annual conference generally attracts 3,000+ participants.

This year, under the auspices of the Outreach Committee, ten institutional members of CLASP partnered to sponsor an exhibit booth that disseminated K–12 materials on Latin America to more than 400 conference attendees. We increased the visibility of CLASP and Latin America at the conference by distributing curriculum, publicizing our educational outreach activities (workshops, study abroad programs, lending libraries, etc.), and promoting the Américas Award.

CLASP generated great feedback and excitement among the many educators who stopped by the booth to learn more about how they could integrate Latin America into their courses.

Next stop: San Francisco, November 17-19, 2017 for the next NCSS. We welcome the participation of any interested CLASP member.

For more info, please contact:
Keira Philipp-Schnurer, Chair, Outreach Committee
University of New Mexico
kphilipp@unm.edu
505.277.7047

——-
Image: Exhibit booth support staff: Lisa Finelli of Vanderbilt University, Keira Philipp-Schnurer of The University of New Mexico; Claudia Girabaldi of University of Chicago; Megan Hasting of The Ohio State University. Not pictured: Lindsey Engleman, University of Texas at Austin.

NOVEMBER 4TH, 2016

Call for Nominations for the 2017 CLASP Junior Faculty Teaching Award for Professors

The Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) calls for nominations for its fifth annual “CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty.” The award recognizes excellence in teaching Latin American Studies designated courses. Tenured faculty members are not eligible. Nominees in a tenure-track position are preferred, but visiting or adjunct professors and instructors are eligible. Nominees must have the Ph.D., and they must be currently teaching at a CLASP member institution. Nominations should come from senior or supervising faculty or administrators. The nominator should provide clear and convincing evidence of the following in a letter of no more than 600 words:

1. Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including pedagogical style and student successes stories.
2. Contributions to the Latin American Studies program and/or the Department.
3. Involvement in the larger community, including professional associations and participation in service activities.
4. Incorporation of own academic research and field experiences into the classroom.

The nominees will be asked to provide a Statement of Teaching Philosophy and a current CV. The CLASP Teaching Committee and former winners will evaluate the nominations and will recommend three finalists to the CLASP Executive Committee. The finalists will then be asked to provide the contact information of two current or former students, and these students will be asked to provide evidence of teaching effectiveness in a recommendation letter. Nominations will be accepted through January 20th 2017.

Simply email the nomination letter to: vgawrons@bsc.edu.

The winner will be presented with an engraved trophy and a check for $500 at either the 2017 Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies Conference (March 23-26) or the Latin American Studies Association International Congress (April 29-May 1).

OCTOBER 25TH, 2016

Call for Nominations for the 2017 CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators

In 2017 the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) calls for nominations for its fourth annual “CLASP Teaching Award for K–12 Educators.” The award was established to recognize excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and/or the Caribbean among elementary, middle, and high school teachers. CLASP proudly honors teachers who have displayed continued dedication to presenting their students with an engaging and dynamic portrait of Latin America that goes beyond the textbook.

Nominations should come from CLASP member institutions; both faculty and administrators may submit a nomination, although only one nomination may be submitted per institution. Nominees do not have to teach at a CLASP member institution.

Procedures for Nomination
Please include the following:

(1) A 1–2-page letter from the nominator providing clear and convincing evidence of the following:
(a) Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including teaching methods and student successes stories
(b) Innovation/creativity in the presentation of Latin American content
© Involvement in professional development and/or community engagement related to Latin America (i.e., the nominee seeks opportunities to learn about/engage with the region).

(2) Supporting information from the nominees, including:
(a) Résumé
(b) Evidence of how they have integrated Latin American content into their classes, including their approach to the teaching of Latin America and how it has helped students attain the goals of the class (1–2 pages)
© One letter of support from a department chair, team leader, curriculum specialist, or supervisor
(d) Other documentation (e.g., excerpts from the lesson, student work, professional development presentation), as appropriate.

Applicants should be advised that their name, email address, and school affiliation may be entered in a CLASP directory of K-12 educators and their curriculum materials incorporated into a CLASP database of K-12 resources. Both the directory and database will be made available to CLASP members with the intention of developing a nationwide network of K-12 educators and resources. The applicants themselves may also be added to a listserv related to this initiative, which would facilitate direct resource sharing and collaboration with their colleagues across the country.

Applications will be reviewed and evaluated for teaching skills, development of innovative teaching materials and strategies, leadership, and professional development accomplishments. Nominations will be accepted through December 15, 2016.

Please email the nomination materials to Keira Philipp-Schnurer, Outreach Committee Chair, at kphilipp@unm.edu.

The winner will be announced in Spring 2017 and will be awarded a $500 cash prize.

Another-great-year-for-the-Amricas-Award
OCTOBER 24TH, 2016

Another great year for the Américas Award!

In September, the Américas Award explored diverse voices found in the Américas Award books through a variety of programs in Washington, D.C.

CLASP awarded the 2016 Américas Award to Ashley Hope Pérez for her work Out of Darkness (Carolrhoda Lab) and Pam Muñoz Ryan for Echo (Scholastic) on September 22, 2016 in front of 60 people at the Library of Congress. The Library of Congress’ Hispanic Division and the Center for the Book co-sponsored the program. The book award ceremony fell right before the National Book Festival which took place on September 25th, 2016. The timing of this year’s ceremony welcomed a friendly crowd of past award winners and long-time friends of the award such as Meg Medina, Lulu Delacre (first Américas Award winning author), Alma Flor Ada, and Isabel Campoy. Joining the program once again this year was Oyster Adams Bilingual School, from which students prepared a reader’s theater presentation of an excerpt of Pam Muñoz Ryan’s Echo.

The annual Américas Award professional development workshop for K-16 educators, Finding Diverse Voices through the Américas Award, was attended by 20 participants, both friends of the Américas award and K-16 educators. This workshop, organized in collaboration with Teaching for Change, attracted educators from around the DC area to engage with Ashley Hope Pérez and Alma Flor Ada on how to diversify classroom libraries. Presentations were also made by educator and curriculum specialist, Katrina Dillon of the University of New Mexico, and Executive Director of Teaching for Change, Deborah Menkart. Participants in the workshop brought home signed copies of 2016 award winner Out of Darkness and Alma Flor Ada’s commended title, Island Treasures. Eleven of the participants were new to the Américas award. CLASP is developing curriculum to accompany Out of Darkness.

Pre and post surveys were conducted and report a high level of satisfaction with the workshop. The data reports that the workshop increased participants’ comfort levels in facilitating conversations about diversity in the classroom, as well as their familiarity with the Américas Book Award. On average, the participants found the workshop very useful for content, curriculum building, and networking. Comments include: “Great space to meet for the workshop; I love being so close and personal with the authors” as well as “I am so glad cultural diversity is becoming an important issue in education. Educational schools for young teaching students need to include it in their academic teaching programs. There is more than one way to teach.”

In addition to the award ceremony and teacher workshop, Ashley Hope Pérez and Alma Flor Ada visited a local public school, the Columbia Heights Educational Campus (CHEC) Middle and High School. Students, teachers and librarians learned about the Américas Award on Friday, September 23, 2016. The school is predominantly Spanish speaking and students were eager to learn more about the Américas Award and to hear firsthand from these award-winning authors. The school librarians prepared a small exhibit for Hispanic Heritage month highlighting both authors’ work. Over 150 students and their teachers came out to learn more about Alma Flor Ada’s experience as a bilingual author and educator. The high school was excited to meet Ashley Hope Pérez where CLASP and Lerner Books donated signed classroom copies of this year’s award winner, Out of Darkness.

The 2016 Américas Award is made possible by these important sponsors: Florida International University, Stanford University, Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Utah, and the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee.
Follow the Américas Award on Facebook or join the Américas listserv by sending an email to claspprograms@gmail.com

The Call for Submissions for the 2017 Américas Award is circulating and the committee members are busy reading submissions for this year’s competition. Decisions will be made by April and the ceremony will be held during Hispanic Heritage month Fall 2017 in Washington, D.C.

MAY 29TH, 2016

Ana Quiceno Winner of 2016 Teaching Award for K-12 Educators

In 2016 CLASP celebrates the third year of its Teaching Award for K-12 Educators, which recognizes excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and/or the Caribbean among elementary, middle, and high school teachers. “Each year this national award process highlights exceptional educators from across the country and brings to light inspiring teaching practices related to Latin America,” said Keira Philipp-Schnurer, chair of the CLASP Outreach Committee.

From among the outstanding teachers nominated in 2016, CLASP recognizes Ana Quiceno of North Carolina as the winner. The award will be publicly announced May 29, 2016, at the 50th International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association in New York, NY.

Quiceno, a Spanish teacher, teaches at Jordan-Matthews, a Title I public high school in Siler City, North Carolina. Originally from Columbia, Quiceno came to the United States in 2012 by way of the VIF program, which encourages global educator development through cultural exchange.

Emily Chávez, Outreach Coordinator at the UNC-Duke Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, who nominated Ms. Quiceno-Echeverry for the award, observes that “always mindful of the personal experiences that her diverse students bring to her classroom, through her creative lessons Ms. Quiceno encourages her Latino students to take pride in their ethnic and cultural backgrounds, while encouraging her U.S. American students to develop respect, appreciation, and interest in the histories and cultures of their Latino peers and neighbors.”

Quiceno herself recounts a common refrain, “teaching a language implies teaching the culture,” when reflecting upon her work. The phrase seems appropriate given that Quiceno’s Spanish and Spanish language arts classes not only strengthen linguistic skills, but moreover expose the students to cultural content through meaningful, personal interactions and diverse readings. Students in Quiceno’s classes connect individually with their peers in Latin American countries via Pen Pal and Skype, as well as with students in other schools within North Carolina – all the while sharing culturally informed content. When not engaging with other students, Quiceno’s classes study diverse perspectives through a wide range of classroom texts.

Quiceno has helped foment a sense of cultural appreciation and pride for Latino and Latin American culture for all of the students at Jordan-Matthews by organizing school-wide activities during Hispanic Heritage Month every year. As Cynthia Bradenberg, the World Languages Department Chairperson and Dual Languages Chairperson at Matthew-Jordans puts it, Quiceno “is the ultimate spokesperson for Latin America and now also for our students at our school!”

CLASP member institutions nominate teachers for consideration of the award. Quiceno was nominated by the UNC-Duke Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies in recognition of her outstanding dedication to the field of Latin American studies.

The awards are administered by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) and decided by the CLASP Outreach Committee, which was comprised of the following individuals in 2016: Keira Philipp-Schnurer, University of New Mexico (chair); Molly Aufdermauer, Stanford University; Emily Chávez, UNC-Duke Consortium in Latin American Studies; Lindsey Engelman, University of Texas at Austin; Lisa Finelli, Vanderbilt University; Karen Goldman, University of Pittsburgh; Luciano Marzulli, University of Utah; and Denise Woltering, Tulane University.

CLASP’s mission is to promote all facets of Latin American Studies throughout the world. Its broad range of activities include the encouragement of research activities, funding for professional workshops, advancement of citizen outreach activities, and development of teaching aids for the classroom.

Pam-Muoz-Ryan-and-Ashley-Hope-Prez-Win-2016-Amricas-Award
MAY 29TH, 2016

Pam Muñoz Ryan and Ashley Hope-Pérez Win 2016 Américas Award

Pam Muñoz Ryan, author of Echo, and Ashley Hope-Pérez, author of Out of Darkness, win the 2016 Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature.The award links the Americas by reaching beyond geographic borders and multicultural-international boundaries, focusing upon cultural heritages within the hemisphere.

Up to two annual book awards are given in recognition of U.S. published works that authentically and engagingly portray Latin America, the Caribbean, or Latinos in the United States. An additional two titles may be recognized as Honorable Mentions, along with a list of Commended Titles. Books are considered for their distinctive literary quality, cultural contextualization, integration of text and illustration, and potential for classroom use.

The announcement was made today by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) during the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) meeting held May 27-30, 2016, in New York, NY. The award-winning authors will be recognized at a ceremony held September 16, 2016, during Hispanic Heritage Month, at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

Members of the 2016 Américas Award Selection Committee include Emily Chávez of Durham, NC; Denise Croker of Nashville, TN; Laura Kleinmann of Washington, D.C.; Paula Mason of Waukesha, WI; and Maria Sheldon of Santa Fe, NM.

The awards are administered by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) and coordinated by Vanderbilt University Center for Latin American Studies and Tulane University Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Generous support is also provided by Florida International University, Stanford University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and the University of Utah.

CLASP’s mission is to promote all facets of Latin American Studies throughout the world. Its broad range of activities include the encouragement of research activities, funding for professional workshops, advancement of citizen outreach activities, and development of teaching aids for the classroom. For complete annotations of all titles recognized by the Américas Award, as well as curricular resources for previous winning titles, visit www.claspprograms.org/americasaward. Follow the Américas Award on Facebook at www.facebook.com/americasaward for current news and author highlights, and join the conversation using #AmericasAward16.

For reference, see the press release of this announcement.

Award Winners

Echo written by Pam Muñoz Ryan. Scholastic Press, 2015. ISBN: 978-0439874021
Echo presents the moving, interwoven stories of three young protagonists who experience the early 20th century’s horrors of war, cruelty, and discrimination. Using music and creativity as a common thread, Muñoz-Ryan deftly ties together what would be an otherwise disconnected set of experiences separated by decades and continents. The resulting novel demonstrates to students that humanity’s similarities outweigh its differences. As committee member Maria Sheldon write, “Muñoz Ryan’s message in Echo sings right off the pages and into students’ imaginations” as the novel invites young readers to experience not only the turmoil of the young character’s lives, but also music’s extraordinary powers to heal, inspire, and connect. (Grades 5-8)

Out of Darkness written by Ashley Hope-Pérez. Carolrhoda Lab, 2015. ISBN: 978-1467742023
Out of Darkness is a book that destroys the reader while at the same time creating a sense of hope, a way out of the darkness. This young adult historical novel Out of Darkness begins with a real event: the explosion of the New London School in East Texas in 1937. Using this tragedy as a centerpiece, a metaphor, and a catalyst, Pérez weaves the fictional stories of two families brought together by forbidden love. Wash Fuller is an educated African American boy successfully navigating the complicated racial divisions of his community. Naomi Smith is a Mexican American girl, terrorized by the sexual advances of her white stepfather, yet compelled to live with him to protect her young twin siblings. This is not a story with a fairy tale ending, but there are moments of great beauty and pure joy as Wash befriends the twins and gradually falls in love with their big sister – all while they are surrounded by the gentle beauty of the East Texas woods. Written for the oldest of teens, Out of Darkness is as violent and cruel as the racially divided world it portrays, yet it also manages to guide readers onto a path out of the unimaginable: speaking truth to lies and writing the stories of those who do not survive. (Grades 10+)

Honorable Mentions

Growing Up Pedro: How the Martinez Brothers Made it from the Dominican Republic All the Way to the Major Leagues written and illustrated by Matt Tavares. Candlewick Press, 2015. ISBN: 978-0763668242
While there have been many Dominican baseball players in the major leagues, none have kindled the deep enthusiasm and allegiance in so many fans as pitcher Pedro Martinez. In his book, Growing Up Pedro: How the Martinez Brothers Made It from the Dominican Republic All the Way to the Major Leagues, Matt Tavares celebrates this larger-than-life baseball hero with meticulous paintings and simple words. Through realistic, almost cinematic paintings that reveal both the panoramic suspense and movement of the game, as well as the intensity as Martinez winds-up to pitch, Tavares takes us into the world of the Martinez brothers as they make their way from a poor Dominican village into the world of the US Major Leagues. Without his brother Ramón, Tavares lead us to believe, there would be no Pedro. The relationship between the two brothers is the centerpiece of the book: whether throwing rocks at mangos as boys or pitching against each other in a historic game in 1996, the two brothers maintain their deep connection and give each other the strength they need to continue through injury and involuntary trades. Any true baseball fan will be thrilled at the page of Martinez’s stats in the back of the book, and aspiring pitchers will thrill at the visual interpretation of three of his classic pitches. From a small boy watching his big brother play in their village to the star pitcher that led the Red Sox to win the World Series in 2004, Tavares gives us a beautiful portrait of one of baseball’s most prized and beloved players. The book is also available in Spanish. (Grades 2-4)

Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh. Harry N. Abrams, 2015. ISBN: 978-1419716478

Author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh’s latest work presents an extraordinary blend of biography, art, and politics focusing on the life of José Guadalupe Posada (1852-1915), or Don Lupe, as he was known at the time. Posada is most famous for his socially-conscious depictions of calaveras, the often comic skeletons that are well-associated with Mexico’s Day of the Dead holiday celebration. This non-fiction picture book will appeal to a wide range of readers, with its engaging hand-drawn, digitally collaged depictions of Don Lupe, first as a child with a natural talent in drawing, and then throughout his adult life as an artist mastering the craft of lithography. Throughout, we see as Done Lupe continuously pursues his artistic passion while offering social commentary about the world around him. The full-page spreads inspired by Don Lupe’s work actively probe the reader to consider deeper meaning behind his artwork, such as critiques about social class, quickly changing technology, and violence during the Mexican Revolution. This superb work is easily adapted to a variety of classroom settings spanning subject areas such as history, art, and cultural studies. Additionally, Tonatiuh includes a detailed author’s note, glossary of terms, and bibliography for readers interested in diving further into Posada’s work. (Grades 3-6)

Commended Titles
See the annotated list for more information about these titles.

A Handful of Stars written by Cynthia Lord. Scholastic Press, 2015. ISBN: 978-0545700276

Dream Things True: A Novel written by Marie Marquardt. St. Martin’s Griffin, 2015. ISBN: 978-1250070456

Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music written by Margarita Engle and illustrated by Rafael López. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Books for Young Readers, 2015. ISBN: 978-0544102293

Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings: A Memoir written by Margarita Engle and illustrated by Edel Rodriguez. Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2015. ISBN: 978-1481435222

Finding the Music / En pos de la música written by Jennifer Torres and illustrated by Renato Alarcão. Lee & Low Books, 2015. ISBN: 978-0892392919

Island Treasures written by Alma Flor Ada and illustrated by Antonio Martorell and Edel Rodriguez. Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2015. ISBN: 978-1481429009

Maya’s Blanket / La manta de Maya written by Monica Brown and illustrated by David Diaz. Lee & Low Books, 2015. ISBN: 978-0892392926

My Tata’s Remedies / Los remedios de mi tata written by Roni Capin Rivera-Ashford and illustrated by Antonio Castro L. Cinco Puntos Press, 2015. ISBN: 978-1935955894

Salsa: Un poema para cocinar / A Cooking Poem written by Jorge Argueta, illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh, and translated by Elisa Amado. Groundwood Books, 2015. ISBN: 978-1554984428

The Jumbies written by Tracey Baptiste. Algonquin Young Readers, 2015. ISBN: 978-1616204143

The Lightning Queen written by Laura Resau. Scholastic Press, 2015. ISBN: 978-0545800846

Two White Rabbits written by Jairo Buitrago and illustrated by Rafael Yockteng. Groundwood Books, 2015. ISBN: 978-1554987412

FEBRUARY 17TH, 2016

2016 Summer Institutes for K-16 Educators

CLASP member institutions regularly hold high quality and engaging summer institutes for K-16 educators. To help publicize and make these programs readily available to K-16 teachers nationwide, the CLASP Outreach Committee compiles and distributes a program list each spring.

This year’s upcoming programs are now compiled and available for review. As of May 3, 2016, there are new programs listed. Please see the 2016 Summer Institutes for Educators list for complete details.

Lastly, please feel free to share this information with your local community of educators!

JANUARY 11TH, 2016

Call for Nominations for the "2016 CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators"

In 2016 the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) calls for nominations for its third annual “Teaching Award for K–12 Educators.” The award was established to recognize excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and/or the Caribbean among elementary, middle, and high school teachers. CLASP proudly honors teachers who have displayed continued dedication to presenting their students with an engaging and dynamic portrait of Latin America that goes beyond the textbook.

Nominations should come from CLASP member institutions; both faculty and administrators may submit a nomination, although only one nomination may be submitted per institution. Nominees do not have to teach at a CLASP member institution. Please see the Call for Nominations for reference.

Procedures for Nomination:

Please include the following:
(1) A 1–2-page letter from the nominator providing clear and convincing evidence of the following: (a) Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including teaching methods and student successes stories (b) Innovation/creativity in the presentation of Latin American content © Involvement in professional development and/or community engagement related to Latin America (i.e., the nominee seeks opportunities to learn about/engage with the region).

(2) Supporting information from the nominees, including: (a) Résumé (b) Evidence of how they have integrated Latin American content into their classes, including their approach to the teaching of Latin America and how it has helped students attain the goals of the class (1–2 pages) © One letter of support from a department chair, team leader, curriculum specialist, or supervisor (d) Other documentation (e.g., excerpts from the lesson, student work, professional development presentation), as appropriate.

Applicants should be advised that their name, email address, and school affiliation may be entered in a CLASP directory of K-12 educators and their curriculum materials incorporated into a CLASP database of K-12 resources. Both the directory and database will be made available to CLASP members with the intention of developing a nationwide network of K-12 educators and resources. The applicants themselves may also be added to a listserv related to this initiative, which would facilitate direct resource sharing and collaboration with their colleagues across the country.

Applications will be reviewed and evaluated for teaching skills, development of innovative teaching materials and strategies, leadership, and professional development accomplishments. The deadline for nominations has been extended until April 18, 2016.

Please email the nomination materials to Keira Philipp-Schnurer, Outreach Committee Chair, at kphilipp@unm.edu.

The winner will be announced at the CLASP meeting at the Latin American Studies Association 2016 International Congress, and will be awarded a $500 cash prize.

JANUARY 4TH, 2016

Call for Nominations for the "2016 CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty"

APRIL 1ST DEADLINE
2016 CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty
The Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) calls for nominations for its fourth annual “CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty.” The award recognizes excellence in teaching Latin American Studies designated courses. Tenured faculty members are not eligible. Nominees in a tenure-track position are preferred, but visiting or adjunct professors and instructors are eligible. Nominees must have the PhD, and they must be currently teaching at a CLASP member institution. Nominations should come from senior faculty members or administrators. The nominator should provide clear and convincing evidence of the following in a letter of no more than 600 words:

1. Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including pedagogical style and student success stories.
2. Contributions to the Latin American Studies program and/or the department.
3. Involvement in the larger community, including professional associations and participation in service activities.
4. Incorporation of own academic research and field experiences into the classroom.

The nominees will be asked to provide a Statement of Teaching Philosophy and a current CV. The CLASP Teaching Committee will evaluate the nominations and will recommend three finalists to the CLASP Executive Committee. The finalists will then be asked to provide the names and contact information of two current or former students, and these students will be asked to provide evidence of teaching effectiveness in a short recommendation letter. Nominations will be accepted through April 1st, 2016.

Simply email the nomination letter to: vgawrons@bsc.edu

The winner will be announced at the CLASP Business Meeting at the Latin American Studies Association 2016 International Congress, and an engraved trophy and a check for $500 will be awarded.

DECEMBER 17TH, 2015

CLASP Congratulates Outreach Committee Chair Keira Phillip-Schnurer for Receiving University of New Mexico's Outstanding Staff Recognition Award

Keira Philipp-Schnurer, the Latin American & Iberian Institute’s Supervisor of Community Education Programs at the University of New Mexico, has been awarded the Gerald W. May Outstanding Staff Recognition Award. This award was created in 1990 by UNM president Gerald W. May to recognize selected staff members’ outstanding contributions to the university. Recipients of this award are lauded for their exceptional service to the UNM community as well as their positive representation of the university and its values. In addition, recipients are recognized for demonstrating dedication, creativity, and involvement through their workplace initiatives and innovations.
Read more here

Amricas-Award-2015-Program-a-Success
OCTOBER 5TH, 2015

Américas Award 2015 Program a Success!

This past September 16 – 18 2015, the Américas Award explored themes of civil rights, identity, and environmental justice through three different educational and cultural programs in Washington, DC. The cultural and educational impact of these events and the books recognized this past year however continue to be felt. The Américas Award continues to support diversity in libraries and engage communities in critical discussions on Latin America and Latino communities in the United States. Below, you will find a description of some of the programs offered in Washington and other programs coming up. If you are interested in getting involved with any of these outreach programs or have ideas for others, please contact Denise Woltering-Vargas or 504.865.5164.

Américas Award 2015

This year’s Américas Award winning authors, Duncan Tonatiuh and Margarita Engle were presented with the 2015 Américas Award for children’s and young adult literature that portray Latin America, the Caribbean, or Latinos in the United States for their books respectively Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation and Engle’s Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal.

Civil Rights through the Américas Award
CLASP introduced 38 K-12 educators in the Washington, D.C. area to themes of civil rights, cultural identity, family and more through the annual “Américas Award Teacher Workshop. This year’s workshop enabled educators to engage with both Duncan Tonatiuh and Margarita Engle in a hands-on, interactive workshop. The teacher workshop was hosted by Busboys & Poets’ 14th street location on Thursday, September 17th from 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM. The workshop was in collaboration with Teaching for Change. To view photos from the workshop, please check out these taken by Teaching for Change and the University of New Mexico.

2015 Américas Award Ceremony was presented on Friday, September 18, 2015 in a ceremony hosted by The Library of Congress and sponsored by the Hispanic Division, the Center for the Book, the Young Readers Center, Abrams Books, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and by Latin American Studies centers at: Florida International University, Stanford University, Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Utah, and the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. The ceremony welcomed a crowd of 84 people from the DC area including two local school groups from Stonewall Middle School in Prince William County and the Oyster Adams Bilingual School in Washington, D.C. Both schools re-enacted scenes from the winning books. Check out pictures from this year’s ceremony taken by Bruce Guthrie from the Library of Congress.

The 2015 Américas Award committee members attended this year’s programming. The 2016 committee is currently busy reading submissions for this year’s competition which is accepting 2015 copyright titles for the 2016 award. Decisions will be made by April and the award ceremony will be during Hispanic Heritage month at The Library of Congress.

Upcoming Curriculum Projects

Américas Award Curriculum Resources

The 2015 Américas Award is made possible by these important sponsors: Florida International University, Stanford University, Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Utah, and the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee.

Follow the Américas Award Facebook page or join the Américas listserv by sending an email to claspprograms@gmail.com.

CLASP-Announces-2015-Amricas-Award-Program
AUGUST 26TH, 2015

CLASP Announces 2015 Américas Award Program

CLASP Announces 2015 Américas Award Program
August 26, 2015

The Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) announces the 2015 Américas Award program scheduled to take place at the start of Hispanic Heritage Month on September 17 and 18, 2015 in Washington, D.C.

This year’s Américas Award winning authors, Duncan Tonatiuh and Margarita Engle will be presented with the 2015 Américas Award for children’s and young adult literature that portray Latin America, the Caribbean, or Latinos in the United States for their books respectively Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation and Engle’s Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal.

CLASP will introduce K-12 educators in the Washington, D.C. area to themes of civil rights, cultural identity, family and more through the annual Américas Award Teacher Workshop. This year’s workshop, Civil Rights through the Américas Award will enable educators to engage with both Duncan Tonatiuh and Margarita Engle in a hands-on, interactive workshop developed for teachers of all subjects and grade levels. The teacher workshop will be held at Busboys & Poets’ 14th street location on Thursday, September 17th from 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM. The workshop is in collaboration with Teaching for Change. Registration is required. More information can be found by contacting: 504-862-3143 or crcrts@tulane.edu.

The 2015 Américas Award will be presented on Friday, September 18, 2015 in a ceremony hosted by The Library of Congress and sponsored by the Hispanic Division, the Center for the Book, the Young Readers Center, Abrams Books, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and by Latin American Studies centers at: Florida International University, Stanford University, Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Utah, and the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. The ceremony will be located in the Library of Congress Hispanic Reading Room, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First Street SE.

Admission to the ceremony is free and open to the public. Please rsvp by contacting: 202-707-2013 or specialevents@loc.gov.

Jamie Lee Marks
Phone: 727-773-7081
jamie.l.marks@vanderbilt.edu

Denise Woltering Vargas
Phone: 504-862-3143
dwolteri@tulane.edu

JULY 1ST, 2015

CLASP Congratulates the 2015 Junior Faculty Teaching Award Winner: Ieva Jusionyte, University of Florida

MAY 29TH, 2015

CLASP Announces Winner of 2015 Teaching Award for K-12 Educators

In 2014, CLASP established the CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators to recognize excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and/or the Caribbean among elementary, middle, and high school teachers. “Each year the award process highlights exceptional educators from across the country and brings to light inspiring teaching practices related to Latin America,” said Keira Philipp-Schnurer, chair of the CLASP Outreach Committee.

From among the outstanding teachers in this year’s nominees, CLASP recognizes Maria Clara Rekow as the 2015 winner of the CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators. A high school Spanish teacher at Bosque School in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Rekow has demonstrated an enduring and innovative commitment to furthering awareness of Latin America within and beyond the confines of her classroom. Born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia, she notes that “being Latin American is a significant part of my identity. During my 25 years as a teacher, I have strived to integrate Latin American studies into my classes’ curricula. By doing so, I not only share a part of who I am, but allow my students to analyze what makes Latin America so unique. In discovering what characterizes each of the countries of Latin America, the students are better equipped to understand various lifestyles, and develop a more open view of the world around them.”

Rekow’s students benefit extensively from her personal and professional dedication to the region. Relying on a creative approach to teaching, she has provided opportunities for students to take advanced Spanish language courses related to science, health, literature, history, culture, and film; to interact with Hispanic members of the broader community; and to connect with peers across private, public, and charter schools to collaboratively research, analyze and debate critical topics relevant to the Americas as a whole. Professional colleagues and students alike express profound appreciation for her work.

CLASP member institutions nominate teachers for consideration of the award. Rekow was nominated by the Latin American and Iberian Institute at the University of New Mexico in recognition of her outstanding dedication to the field of Latin American studies.

The award will be publicly announced May 29, 2015, at the XXXIII International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

2015-Amricas-Award-goes-to-Duncan-Tonatiuh-and-Margarita-Engle
MAY 28TH, 2015

2015 Américas Award goes to Duncan Tonatiuh and Margarita Engle

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Denise Woltering-Vargas (Tulane University or 504-862-3143) Jamie Lee Marks, (Vanderbilt University)
Coordinators, Américas Award – CLASP

May 28, 2015

2015 Américas Award goes to Duncan Tonatiuh and Margarita Engle

Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation by Duncan Tonatiuh is one of this year’s 2015 Américas Award winners. Margarita Engle, author of Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal also wins this year’s 2015 Américas Award. The award links the Americas to reach beyond geographic borders, as well as multicultural-international boundaries, focusing instead upon cultural heritages within the hemisphere.

The awards are administered by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) and coordinated by both Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies. Generous support is also provided by Florida International University, the University of Florida, University of New Mexico, Stanford University, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. and the University of Utah

Award Winners

Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation, published by Abrams Books is the story of a young girl and her family fighting for desegregation during a time of racial discrimination against Hispanics and minorities in general. Seven years before the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education addressed segregation in schools throughout the country, the similarly significant but less known case of Mendez vs. Westminster School District challenged school segregation in California. Author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh has made this history available to young readers everywhere for the first time as he documents Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight for desegregation through the book Separate is Never Equal. The text pays tribute to this historical moment of social justice and the people who made it happen by drawing on court testimonies and personal interviews to ensure authenticity and accuracy. An author’s note, glossary of legal terms, and bibliography complement the text and provide both younger and older readers with valuable resources for understanding the case’s development and its ongoing implications. In addition to the meticulous text, readers will enjoy Tonatiuh’s signature artistry as he draws upon Mesoamerican codices to create modern, multimedia collages of the Mendez family alongside people from their school, community, and trial. With this children’s book, Tonatiuh offers a significant contribution to US and Mexican-American histories. It would be a valuable asset to any elementary classroom or library. (Grades 1-6)

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and written by Margarita Engle. With her characteristic economic yet moving verse Margarita Engle once again transports us to a world and time that few writers have explored, especially in the genre of children’s literature. Silver People tells the story of the building of the Panama Canal, which opened in 1914 and connected the two largest oceans in the world, while at the same time signaling America’s emergence as a global superpower. The canal was a miraculous engineering feat that created a path of water through a tropical jungle where a mountain once stood. Yet miracles often come with a steep price. Thousands of brown and black Caribbean Americans lost their lives, and those that survived were paid in silver, while their white counterparts earned gold. Engle gives these workers a voice, transporting us to the bottom of “serpentine cut” and describing the backbreaking labor required to accomplish it. We are also treated to the voices of the natural world that loudly or silently protest while their habitat is destroyed. This unique work and the apartheid-like inequality it portrays is a powerful contribution to Latino Children’s Literature. Once read, it’s accurate description of the construction of the “largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken” will not be soon forgotten. (Grades 7 and up)

Honor Books

The Américas Committee selected two Honor Books; Migrant written by José Manuel Mateo and illustrated by Javier Martínez Pedro published by Abrams Books for Young Readers and Strike! The Farm Workers’ Fight for their Rights by Larry Dane Brimner published by Calkins Creek.

Commended Titles

Twelve commended titles were selected this year by the committee: A de Activista written by Martha González and illustrated by Innosanto Nagara, and published by Triangle Square; Abuelo by Arthur Dorros and illustrated by Raúl Colón, published by HarperCollins Publishers, Caminar by Skila Brown, published by Candlewick Press; Dalia’s Wondrous Hair/El Cabello Maravilloso de Dalia by Laura Lacámara, published by Piñata Books; Frida & Diego: Art, Love, Life by Catherine Reef, published by Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt; Gabi, A Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero, published by Cinco Puntos Press; Green is a Chile Pepper: a Book of Colors written by Roseanne Greenfield Thong and illustrated by John Parra, published by Chronicle Books; I Lived on Butterfly Hill by Marjorie Agosín, illustrations by Lee White (Atheneum Books for Young Readers); Letters from Heaven by Lydia Gil, published by Piñata Books; Low Riders in Space written by Cathy Camper and illustrated by Raúl the Third, published by Chronicle Books; Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes written by Juan Felipe Herrera and illustrated by Raúl Colón, published by Penguin Group; The Secret Side of Empty written by Maria E. Andreu, published by Running Press; T’was Nochebuena written by Roseanne Greenfield Thong, illustrated by Sara Palacios and published by Penguin Group.

Complete annotations of the Américas Award 2015 will be posted on the CLASP website soon.

CLASP’s mission is to promote all facets of Latin American studies throughout the world. Its broad range of activities include the encouragement of research activities, funding of professional workshops, advancement of citizen outreach activities, and development of teaching aids for the classroom.

Find us on Facebook for all updates on Américas Award titles: www.facebook.com/americasaward

For more information on the Américas Award make sure to go to the site.

MAY 11TH, 2015

2015 Summer Institutes for Educators

CLASP member institutions regularly hold high quality and engaging summer teacher institutes for K-12 educators. To help ensure that these nationwide programs are publicized and made available to teachers across the country, CLASP distributes a compiled program list. See the PDF below for selective summer institutes scheduled for 2015:

Original document shared for review: 2015 Summer Institutes for Educators

Document with most recent revisions: Corrected – 2015 Summer Institutes for Educators

Please look through the list to confirm the information is correct for your university, and to ensure that we have not accidentally omitted a relevant summer institute. Send any updates to kphilipp@unm.edu.

APRIL 23RD, 2015

AY Latin American LCTL List Available and in Need of Updates

On the language page is a pdf of the list of AY programs offering Latin American LCTLs compiled by Beatriz Riefkohl; it has now been updated with information received at the NRC Directors Meeting in March.

Please look through the list to make sure the information we have is correct for your university (language offerings, instructors and administrative contacts, etc). Send any updates to avery.dickins-degiron@vanderbilt.edu.

Amricas-Award-Curriculum-Explores-Immigration-through-Literature-and-Art
APRIL 21ST, 2015

Américas Award Curriculum Explores Immigration through Literature and Art

While the Américas Award Review Committee meets this spring to discuss titles for recognition in 2015, one book honored last year continues to receive widespread interest: Duncan Tonatiuh’s Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote: A Migrant’s Tale (Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2014). CLASP is pleased to announce that, as part of this continued interest, it has published an educator’s guide to accompany the book.

As the publisher describes, “In this allegorical picture book, a young rabbit named Pancho eagerly awaits his papa’s return. Papa Rabbit traveled north two years ago to find work in the great carrot and lettuce fields to earn money for his family. When Papa does not return, Pancho sets out to find him. He packs Papa’s favorite meal—mole, rice and beans, a heap of warm tortillas, and a jug of aguamiel—and heads north. He meets a coyote, who offers to help Pancho in exchange for some of Papa’s food. They travel together until the food is gone and the coyote decides he is still hungry . . . for Pancho! Duncan Tonatiuh brings to light the hardship and struggles faced by thousands of families who seek to make better lives for themselves and their children by illegally crossing the border.”

In 2014, the CLASP Américas Award Review Committee awarded Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote an Honorable Mention. To encourage K-12 educators to use the book as a resource in the classroom, CLASP also sponsored the development of a comprehensive curriculum guide for K-12 educators. We are pleased to report that the guide is finally complete after a long process of collaborative input and revision. Thanks are due to Katrina Dillon, Ph.D. candidate in the College of Education at the University of New Mexico, for producing the document.

As Dillon writes, this is “one of those rare books that has value in elementary, middle, and high school classrooms…the book can be read on two levels, both as a fable and as an allegory. As a fable, it’s accessible to young readers, while as an allegory it’s appropriate for older readers who can analyze and discuss the multiple layers and the sociopolitical message of the tale.” The guide pulls together pre- and post-reading activities, interdisciplinary connections, and complementary resources — all designed to provide educators with adaptable tools for teaching about immigration through literature and art. In addition, with the gracious permission of author and illustrator Tonatiuh, the guide also includes high resolution copies of the book’s illustrations, which will enable the book to be shared easily with an entire classroom.

We invite you to learn more by reading the complete document: CLASP Educator’s Guide to Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote. Individuals interested in the topic of immigration through literature may also appreciate the Américas Award guide to Children and the Border, a list of recommended books for all ages on this theme.

The publication of this curriculum guide is only one part of the year-long programming and resources that CLASP facilitates to support and highlight the Américas Award. Each year award-winning titles are recognized through workshops, book group meetings, conference exhibits, presentations, and author visits to the classroom. To learn more about how to become involved, please contact the award co-coordinators: Denise Woltering-Vargas (dwolteri@tulane.edu) or Jamie Lee Marks (Jamie.l.marks@vanderbilt.edu).

MARCH 15TH, 2015

Call for Nominations: 2015 CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators

In 2015, the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) calls for nominations for its second annual “CLASP Teaching Award for K–12 Educators.” The award was established to recognize excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and/or the Caribbean among elementary, middle, and high school teachers. CLASP proudly honors teachers who have displayed continued dedication to presenting their students with an engaging and dynamic portrait of Latin America that goes beyond the textbook. For reference, please see the 2015 CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators Call for Nominations

Nominations should come from CLASP member institutions; both faculty and administrators may submit a nomination, although only one nomination may be submitted per institution. Nominees do not have to teach at a CLASP member institution.

Procedures for Nomination Please include the following: (1) A 1–2-page letter from the nominator providing clear and convincing evidence of the following: (a) Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including teaching methods and student successes stories (b) Innovation/creativity in the presentation of Latin American content © Involvement in professional development and/or community engagement related to Latin America (i.e., the nominee seeks opportunities to learn about/engage with the region).

(2) Supporting information from the nominees, including: (a) Résumé (b) Evidence of how they have integrated Latin American content into their classes, including their approach to the teaching of Latin America and how it has helped students attain the goals of the class (1–2 pages) © One letter of support from a department chair, team leader, curriculum specialist, or supervisor (d) Other documentation (e.g., excerpts from the lesson, student work, professional development presentation), as appropriate.

Applicants should be advised that their name, email address, and school affiliation may be entered in a CLASP directory of K-12 educators and their curriculum materials incorporated into a CLASP database of K-12 resources. Both the directory and database will be made available to CLASP members with the intention of developing a nationwide network of K-12 educators and resources. The applicants themselves may also be added to a listserv related to this initiative, which would facilitate direct resource sharing and collaboration with their colleagues across the country.

Applications will be reviewed and evaluated for teaching skills, development of innovative teaching materials and strategies, leadership, and professional development accomplishments.The deadline has been extended to May 18, 2015.

Please email the nomination materials to Keira Philipp-Schnurer, Outreach Committee Chair, at kphilipp@unm.edu.

If the timeline permits, the winner will be announced at the CLASP meeting at the Latin American Studies Association 2015 International Congress. The winner will receive a $250 cash prize.

JANUARY 10TH, 2015

Call For Nominations: 2015 CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty

2015 CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty

The Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) calls for nominations for its third annual “CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty.” The award recognizes excellence in teaching Latin American Studies designated courses. Faculty eligible for nomination must be currently in a tenure-track position or must have completed their PhD within the last four years, and he or she must be currently teaching at a CLASP member institution. Nominations should come from senior faculty or administrators. The nominator should provide clear and convincing evidence of the following in a letter of no more than 600 words:

1. Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including pedagogical style and student successes stories.
2. Contributions to the Latin American Studies program and/or the department.
3. Involvement in the larger community, including professional associations and participation in service activities.
4. Incorporation of own academic research and field experiences into the classroom.

The nominees will be asked to provide a Statement of Teaching Philosophy and a current CV. The CLASP Teaching Committee will evaluate the nominations and will recommend three finalists to the CLASP Executive Committee. The finalists will then be asked to provide the names and contact information of two current or former students, and these students will be asked to provide evidence of teaching effectiveness in a recommendation letter. Nominations will be accepted through April 1st, 2015.

Simply email the nomination letter to: vgawrons@bsc.edu

The winner will be announced at the CLASP Business Meeting at the Latin American Studies Association 2015 International Congress.

JANUARY 7TH, 2015

2015 Summer Language Programs List now available

CLASP-Elections-for-2015
JANUARY 5TH, 2015

CLASP Elections for 2015

Congratulations and welcome to our incoming 2015 CLASP Officers –

  • President Beatriz Riefkohl-Muniz (UNC)
  • Vice-President/President-Elect Alberto Vargas (UW-Madison)
  • Executive Committee members: Amanda Wolfe (UNM), Vince Gawronkski (Southern Birmingham) and Amy Risley (Rhodes).

Many thanks also go out to those EC members whose terms come to an end on Dec. 31, 2014:

  • Natalie Arsenault (U. Chicago)
  • David Arriaza (UCLA)

Our appreciation also for the service of both Carol Robison (OSU) and Jill Kuhnheim (KU) and CLASP wishes them well in their future endeavors.

Amricas-Award-Sparks-Important-Discussions-in-the-Classroom-
DECEMBER 19TH, 2014

Américas Award Sparks Important Discussions in the Classroom

This past October 2014, the Américas Award explored themes of immigration, identity, bullying, and environmental justice through three different educational and cultural programs in Washington, DC. The cultural and educational impact of these events and the books recognized this past year however continue to be felt. The Américas Award continues to be supporting diversity in libraries and engaging communities in critical discussions on Latin America and Latino communities in the United States. Below, you will find a description of some of the programs offered in Washington and other programs coming up. If you are interested in getting involved with any of these outreach programs or have ideas for others, please contact Denise Woltering-Vargas or 504.865.5164.

Américas Award 2014

Parrots Over Puerto Rico on Exhibit
Original art from the 2014 Américas Award winning authors Cindy Trumbore and illustrator Susan Roth. This exhibit was on display at The Library of Congress Young Reader’s Center through October 24, 2014. The artist Susan Roth, spoke to students from the local dual language immersion school, Oyster Adams Bilingual School about her artwork. Students from this school recently wrote a review of Parrots Over Puerto Rico for Science Magazine.

Exploring Immigration and Identity in the K-12 Classroom using Américas Award Books
This educator workshop in collaboration with Teaching for Change and hosted by Busboys & Poets took place on Friday October 3rd, 2014. Twenty-one educators participated in the two and a half hour workshop. The workshop focused on Duncan Tonatiuh’s Honor title Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote and commended title, Meg Medina’s Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick your Ass. Both authors presented their book and strategies for incorporating them into the classroom. Teaching for Change’s Julian Hipkins coordinated a hands-on role play simulation focusing on lesser known Central American social activists. Each participant received both books, a curriculum on Central America developed by Teaching for Change, Américas Award bookmarks and access to teaching materials on the interactive Américas Award workshop website. Public Radio International’s The World highlighted the teacher workshop as part of a larger article on the absence of kids books on immigrant communities.

Américas Award Ceremony
Over 60 participants attended this year’s award ceremony. The ceremony included a presentation by Honor Book winner, Duncan Tonatiuh and award winners Cindy Trumbore and Susan Roth. The Library of Congress webcast for this program will be available shortly. It will be uploaded here.

The 2015 Américas Award committee members attended this year’s programming. The 2015 committee is currently busy reading submissions for this year’s competition which is still accepting 2014 copyright titles for the 2015 award. Decisions will be made by April and the award ceremony will be Friday, September 25, 2015 at The Library of Congress.

Upcoming Projects

K–5 Teachers Workshop: Exploring Immigration and Identity Using Children’s Literature
February 6, 2015
Sponsored by Stanford University’s Center for Latin American Studies and the Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education.
Register by clicking here
Download the workshop flyer

Américas Award Curriculum Resource
The University of New Mexico’s Latin American & Iberian Institute is currently finalizing a comprehensive K-12 educational resource for educators to accompany Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote.

The 2014 Américas Award is made possible by these important sponsors: Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, Florida International University, Stanford University, The Ohio State University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Utah, and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Follow the Américas Award Facebook page or join the Américas listserv by sending an email to claspprograms@gmail.com.

2014-Amricas-Award-Weekend
SEPTEMBER 5TH, 2014

2014 Américas Award Weekend

CLASP is pleased to present a series of events to celebrate the 2014 Américas Award winner, Parrots over Puerto Rico. The events feature a K-12 teacher workshop using books recognized in this year’s award competition, the awards ceremony, and an exhibit of artwork from this year’s winner.

The K-12 teacher workshop, Exploring Immigration and Identity in the K-12 Classroom with Américas Award Books, will be held at Busboy’s and Poets in Washington, D.C. on October 3rd. The workshop will feature the author of this year’s Honorable Mention book Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote, Duncan Tonatiuh, and the author of Commended Title Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick your Ass, Meg Medina. Both authors will be in attendance to work with teachers on activities and strategies to best engage young readers with the complexity of immigration as it relates to family, education, and identity. For more information or to register for the workshop please visit the event page.

The Américas Award Ceremony will take place from 3:00-5:00 PM on October 3rd at the Pickford Theater in the Library of Congress. Attendees of the teacher workshop will have plenty of time to make their way over to the ceremony! The ceremony will celebrate Parrots over Puerto Rico and authors Susan L. Roth and Cindy Trumbore. Both authors will be in attendance. If you plan on attending, please RSVP directly to the Library of Congress (specialevents@loc.gov).

This year CLASP is particularly excited to announce that the original artwork for Parrots Over Puerto Rico, by Susan Roth, will be on exhibit at the Library of Congress. The Young Readers Center is a public space in the Library of Congress. During the months of October and November visitors to the space will be able to see Roth’s beautiful artwork. Roth creates cloth collages, which are then photographed and used to illustrate her books.

JUNE 5TH, 2014

CLASP Congratulates the 2014 Junior Faculty Teaching Award Winner: Veronica I. Garibotto

Assistant Professor, The University of Kansas, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Ph.D. Hispanic Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburgh. Main focus: Latin American literature and cultural theory. Minor: Brazilian literature. August 2008.

Dissertation Committee: Gerald Martin, John Beverley, Joshua Lund, Reid Andrews.

M.A. Hispanic Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburgh. April 2004.

Licenciatura en Letras, Universidad de Buenos Aires. Area of specialization: Literary Theory. Received with honors. July 2002.

Profesora especializada en Educación Inicial, Instituto Superior de Formación Docente. Received with honors. December 1997.

MAY 7TH, 2014

CLASP White Paper on the Teaching of Portuguese

Margo Milleret of the University of New Mexico has written the first CLASP White Paper on “Factors Influencing the Growth of Portuguese Enrollments in the 21st Century”. Please download the paper from the CLASP Publications page.

Cindy-Trumbore-and-Susan-Roth-Win-2014-Amricas-Award
APRIL 23RD, 2014

Cindy Trumbore and Susan Roth Win 2014 Américas Award!

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Denise Woltering Vargas or Claire González
Coordinators, Américas Award – CLASP
Tulane University & Vanderbilt University
504-865-5164
dwolteri@tulane.edu

April 23, 2014

Cindy Trumbore and Susan Roth win 2014 Américas Award

Cindy Trumbore and Susan L. Roth, co-authors and illustrator Susan L. Roth of Parrots Over Puerto Rico won the 2014 Américas Award. This book was awarded the 2014 award because of the way in which it portrays Latin America and the Caribbean. The award links the Americas to reach beyond geographic borders, as well as multicultural-international boundaries, focusing instead upon cultural heritages within the hemisphere.

The awards are administered by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) and coordinated by both Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies. Generous support is also provided by Florida International University, The Ohio State University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, Stanford University, and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Award Winner

Parrots Over Puerto Rico, published by Lee & Low Books Inc. is the story of the Puerto Rican parrot, which once numbered in the hundreds of thousands, nearly became extinct, and is slowly making a comeback. But this is also a history, told with surprisingly little text, of the various peoples who have shared the island with the parrots and whose mixing makes up the human population of Puerto Rico today. Integrated into these narratives is information about the island’s flora and other fauna, international politics, and, most particularly, man’s role in the near-demise of the Puerto Rican parrot. Much of the book, including its afterword, tells in great detail of the ongoing efforts of the scientists of the Puerto Rican Parrot Recovery Program to restore the island’s parrot population.

The Américas Committee selected two Honor Books; Diego Rivera: An Artist for the People written by Susan Goldman Rubin and Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote,“ written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh both published by Abrams Books for Young Readers.

Honor Books

Diego Rivera: An Artist for the People thoughtfully connects the biography with the art, while Rubin expertly covers Rivera’s complexity as an artist or as a person, without exaggeration. Carefully selected artwork and photographs, as well as Rivera’s own words, bring added depth to the text.

Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote brings to light the hardship and struggles faced by thousands of families who seek to make better lives for themselves and their children by illegally crossing the border. The story focuses on a young rabbit who awaits the return of his papa who traveled north two years ago to find work in the great carrot and lettuce fields to earn money for his family. Papa never returned and Pancho sets out to find him.

Commended Titles

Seven commended titles were selected this year by the committee, Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass written by Meg Medina published by Candlewick Press, María Tenía una Llamita Pequeña/María Had a Little Llama illustrated and written by Angela Dominguez and published by Henry Holt & Company, Tito Puente: Mambo King/Rey del Mundo illustrated by Rafael López and written by Monica Brown, published by Rayo, an imprint of Harper Collins, Lightning Dreamer written by Margarita Engle, published by Harcourt, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, Enrique’s Journey by Sonia Nazario, published by Random House, Round is a Tortilla, illustrated by John Parra and written by Roseanne Thong, published by Chronicle Books, and Serafina’s Promise written by Ann E. Burg and published by Scholastic Press.

Complete annotations of the Américas Award 2014 will be posted here, please check back soon for this resource.

Members of the 2014 Américas Award Selection Committee are: Chair Barbara D’Ambruoso, Orange, CT; Aaron Forbes, Morris Jeff Community School, New Orleans, LA; Keira Philipp-Schnurer, University of New Mexico, NM; Lucia Acosta, Princeton Public Library, NJ; and Robin Fogle Kurz, Louisiana State University, LA.

CLASP’s mission is to promote all facets of Latin American studies throughout the world. Its broad range of activities include the encouragement of research activities, funding of professional workshops, advancement of citizen outreach activities, and development of teaching aids for the classroom.

Find us on Facebook for all updates on Américas Award titles: www.facebook.com/americasaward

For more information on the Américas Award make sure to go to the site

MARCH 3RD, 2014

2014 CLASP/NRC Teacher Training Network: summer K-12 teacher opportunities

Via the CLASP/NRC Teacher Training Network, K-12 teachers can learn about professional development opportunities available nationally this summer. In addition, several U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers (NRCs) for Latin American Studies have committed professional development support for their regional teachers. By collaborating, the participating centers hope to give K-12 educators access to the quality summer teacher institutes offered nationally by a network of Latin American studies centers. A selected list of summer opportunities follows.

2014_CLASPNRC_teacher__opportunities-1393865869.pdf

FEBRUARY 18TH, 2014

2014 Call for Nominations for the 2nd Annual Teaching Award for Junior Faculty

2014 CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty

The Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) calls for nominations for its second annual “CLASP Teaching Award for Junior Faculty.” The award recognizes excellence in teaching Latin American Studies designated courses. Faculty eligible for nomination must be currently in a tenure-track position or must have completed their PhD within the last four years, and they must be currently teaching at a CLASP member institution. Nominations should come from senior faculty or administrators. The nominator should provide clear and convincing evidence of the following in a letter of no more than 600 words:

1. Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including pedagogical style and student successes stories.
2. Contributions to the Latin American Studies program and/or the department.
3. Involvement in the larger community, including professional associations and participation in service activities.
4. Incorporation of own academic research and field experiences into the classroom.

The nominees will be asked to provide a Statement of Teaching Philosophy and a current CV. The CLASP Teaching Committee will evaluate the nominations and will recommend three finalists to the CLASP Executive Committee. The finalists will then be asked to provide the names and contact information of two current or former students, and these students will be asked to provide evidence of teaching effectiveness in a recommendation letter. Nominations will be accepted through April 1st, 2014.

Simply email the nomination letter to: vgawrons@bsc.edu

The winner will be announced at the CLASP Business Meeting at the Latin American Studies Association 2014 International Congress.

JANUARY 16TH, 2014

Latin American LCTL 2014 Summer Program List now available!

Please use the Language tab above to access information for programs on Brazilian Portuguese, Haitian Creole, and indigenous Latin American languages.

CLASP-Executive-Committee-Meeting-Hosted-by-FIU-in-Miami
NOVEMBER 22ND, 2013

CLASP Executive Committee Meeting Hosted by FIU in Miami

The CLASP Executive Committee held its annual strategic planning meeting at Florida International University Miami Beach Urban Studios on November 21-22, 2013. The EC thanks the Latin American and Caribbean Center at Florida International University for hosting the meeting and their hospitality during our stay in Miami. EC members pictured in the photo (from left to right) include:

  • Valerie McGinley, Tulane University
  • Carol Robison, The Ohio State University
  • Vince Gawronski, Birmingham-Southern College
  • Elizabeth Mahan, University of Connecticut
  • Natalie Arsenault, University of Chicago
  • David Arriaza, University of California Los Angeles
  • Natalie Hartman, Duke University
  • Paul Duncan, University of Georgia
  • Liesl Picard, Florida International University

Avery Dickens de Girón and Julie Walsh McMurtry joined the meeting virtually from Vanderbilt University and Georgetown University respectively. Thanks to all EC members and their institutions for supporting the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs.

NOVEMBER 22ND, 2013

Join CLASP at LASA 2014!

In its role as a leader in the promotion of Latin American studies across the globe, CLASP will once again demonstrates a strong presence at the XXXII International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association (May 21-24, 2014 in Chicago, IL). CLASP-related activities include:

CLASP Outreach Meeting
Friday, May 23, 2014
6:00pm – 7:45pm

CLASP Business Meeting
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00pm – 9:45pm

CLASP Outreach Panel: “Bringing Brazil and Portuguese into the U.S. K–12 Education System”
Saturday, May 24, 2014
6:00pm – 7:45pm

JUNE 21ST, 2013

CLASP Congratulates 2013 Junior Faculty Teaching Award Recipient Andrew Paxman

Andrew Paxman, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of History
Millsaps College

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
M.A. (Latin American Studies), University of California, Berkeley
M.A. (English Literature), University of Delaware
B.A., University of Southampton, England

Andrew Paxman teaches Latin American history and specializes in 20th-century Mexico. He also teaches courses on contemporary Latin American Studies, film history, and biography. During the 1990s he worked as a journalist, based chiefly in Mexico City, including a five-year stint as Latin America correspondent for the Hollywood trade paper Variety, for which he covered the region’s TV and film industries. In 2000, he published El Tigre: Emilio Azcárraga y su imperio Televisa, the biography of a Mexican media mogul, co-authored with Claudia Fernández.

Paxman’s next book is a biography of William O. Jenkins (1878-1963), a small-town Tennessean who settled in Mexico in 1901. Through successful ventures in textiles, property speculation, sugar planting, banking, and film exhibition, he reportedly became the richest man in Mexico. Jenkins was overlord of the Mexican film industry during its Golden Age of the 1940s and 1950s, and upon his death he left his entire fortune to a charitable foundation, which in turn set up Puebla’s University of the Americas (UDLA).

2013-Amricas-Award-Announced
JUNE 3RD, 2013

2013 Américas Award Announced

For Immediate Release

May 29, 2013

Sonia Manzano wins 2013 Américas Award

WASHINGTON, DC – Sonia Manzano, author of The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano won the 2013 Américas Award. This book was awarded the 2013 award which engagingly portrays Latin America, the Caribbean, or Latinos in the United States. The award links the Americas to reach beyond geographic borders, as well as multicultural-international boundaries, focusing instead upon cultural heritages within the hemisphere. The awards were announced today by the Consortium for Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP), during the Latin American Studies Association meeting held May 29 – June 1 in Washington, DC.

The awards are administered by CLASP and coordinated by both Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies.

Award Winner
The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano, published by Scholastic highlights two revolutions: the Young Lords in the community of East Harlem and Evelyn Serrano’s own coming of age. Committee member América Calderón found that “the two intertwine, making this an engaging and educational story for middle and high school students. Sonia Manzano sets this historical fiction in 1969, when the Young Lords occupy a church, calling attention to the need for free breakfast and other community programs. The book is an ideal introduction for students to the Young Lords, a key yet seldom taught story Puerto Ricans in the modern Civil Rights Movement. (The Young Lords were established in 1968 in various cities in the U.S. as “a human rights movement for self determination for Puerto Rico and other nations, and for neighborhood controlled development and empowerment.”)

Author, Sonia Manzano, is best known for her role as “Maria” on the acclaimed television series Sesame Street. While Manzano is an Emmy Award winner for her television writing, this is her first novel.

The Américas Committee selected one Honor Book; Martín de Porres: The Rose in the Desert written by Gary D. Schmidt and illustrated by David Diaz published by Clarion Books.

Honor Book
Martin de Porres tells the moving story of the first Black Catholic Saint of the Americas. The illegitimate son of a former slave and a Spanish conqueror, Martin grew up in the poorest barrio of 17th century Lima, Peru where ‘hunger lived in their home and illness was their companion.’ The Rose in the Desert tells how the child was taken in as a servant by Dominican Friars, where he became known for his miraculous ability to heal both animals and humans. The poor came to Martin to be healed, and soon Spanish royals began to request his services but ‘learned to wait for him to tend the poorest among the barrios first.’ In spite of his humble spirit and service to the community, the mulatto child was frowned upon by the friars and addressed as ‘son of a slave’ and ‘mongrel.’ Finally, some thirteen years after his arrival at the monastery, he was permitted to take his vows as a Dominican tertiary. Among the Dominican brothers, he performed miracles and heal the sick, until his death in 1639.

In San Martin, young readers learn about universal concepts such as charity, poverty, justice and community. Moments of tribulation, compassion and triumph are all present in this simple yet lyrical text. A full palette of emotion is expressed through mixed media illustrations which provide a unique blend of shapes and vibrant watercolors. This story of the patron saint of interracial harmony and social causes leaves the reader with a feeling of inspiration and hope for humanity. (Grades K-4)

Three commended titles were selected this year by the committee, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe written by Benjamin Alire Saenz published by Simon & Schuster, Drummer Boy of John John written by Mark Greenwood and illustrated by Frané Lessac published by Lee & Low Books and In Darkness by Nick Lake and published by Bloomsbury.

Commended Titles
Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe is the deeply moving account of two young men growing into adulthood in El Paso, Texas, in the late 1980s. Sentences are expertly distilled – spare in words, but rich in meticulous details and astute character development. Readers follow the two young men as they thoughtfully discover the complexities of the world around them as well as truths about themselves – indeed, the secrets of the universe. Woven throughout are details that expand the novel’s relevance: nuanced depictions of Mexican-American families and their heritage; musings about the purpose of life; and honest questions about sexuality and love. In telling the story of their coming of age, Sáenz offers homage to, “all the boys who’ve had to learn to play by different rules.” It is a novel that can complement discussions (in the classroom and beyond) around discrimination in response to culture and the LGBTQ community. At its core, the novel shows Saénz unearthing how to be true to oneself – something to which we can all relate. (Grades 9-12)

Drummer Boy of John John
This book’s story is inspired by that of Winston “Spree” Simon, the creator of Trinidad and Tobago’s national instrument, the steel drum. Drums and other percussive instruments take center stage in young Winston’s quest to compete to have the best band in his island’s Carnival parade. The celebration of sound drives the story, with onomatopoeia serving as an effective device to draw the reader into the fun feeling of Carnival. Young Winston hears percussive instruments all around him, and, discovering a wealth of sounds from all sorts of found objects, he eventually founds a “junkyard band,” which takes first prize. The illustrator’s use of vibrant tones and people in motion capture the energy of the occasion. Whimsical scenes in the junkyard and beyond add interest to the telling of this tale for young readers. (Grades K-3)

In Darkness
Trapped in crushing darkness beneath debris of the 2010 earthquake, Shorty recalls his violent, gang-controlled life in Haitian slums. While despairing of rescue, he is heartened and disturbed by thoughts of Toussaint l’Ouverture who led a slave revolt in the eighteenth century and died in darkness. Ultimately Shorty is prepared to reclaim his life. ”I was in darkness, but now I am in light.” By braiding the parallel lives of Shorty and Toussaint, Lake paints an alarming, thought-provoking portrait of Haitian history, both present and past. It gives young readers a heady mix of the social, religious, and political realities of the Americas’ poorest country. (Grades 9-12)

Members of the 2013 Américas Award Selection Committee are: Chair Hope Crandall, Washington Elementary Library, Woodburn, OR; Aaron Forbes, Morris Jeff Community School, New Orleans, LA; América Calderón, Teaching for Change, Washington, DC; Barbara D’Ambruoso, Lauralton Hall, Orange, CT, and Keira Philipp-Schnurer, University of New Mexico, NM.

CLASP’s mission is to promote all facets of Latin American studies throughout the world. Its broad range of activities include the encouragement of research activities, funding of professional workshops, advancement of citizen outreach activities, and development of teaching aids for the classroom.

Find us on Facebook for all updates on Américas Award titles: www.facebook.com/americasaward

For more information on the Américas Award make sure to go to the site

MAY 20TH, 2013

CLASP General Membership Business Meeting To Be Held at LASA 2013

All CLASP members are invited to attend the Spring 2013 CLASP Business Meeting held in conjunction with the XXXI International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association. The meeting will be held on Thursday, May 30, 2013 from 7:00pm-8:45pm at the Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, DC.

MAY 20TH, 2013

CLASP Shows Strong Presence at LASA 2013

In its role as a leader in the promotion of Latin American studies across the globe, CLASP once again demonstrates a strong presence at the XXXI International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association (May 29-June 1, 2013; Washington, DC). CLASP-related activities include:

CLASP Business Meeting
Thursday, May 30, 2013
7:00pm – 8:45pm

CLASP Outreach Panel: “The Social Contract of Latin American Studies Programs: Innovation in Public Education”
Friday, May 31, 2013
10:30am – 12:15pm

CLASP Language Panel: “Teaching Latin American Languages: Challenges and Opportunities on the Current University Landscape”
Friday, May 31, 2013
5:00pm – 6:45pm

CLASP Outreach Meeting
Friday, May 31, 2013
7:00pm – 8:45pm

Outreach Panel: “Expanding K-16 LAC Programming to STEM and Beyond”
Saturday, June 1, 2013
8:30am – 10:15am

2013-CLASPNRC-Teacher-Training-Network
MARCH 15TH, 2013

2013 CLASP/NRC Teacher Training Network

The national Latin American Studies Teacher Training Network: Five Title VI-funded National Resource Centers for Latin American Studies, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, have committed funding to support professional development for their regional teachers. By collaborating, we hope to give K-12 educators access to quality summer teacher institutes offered nationally by a network of Latin American studies centers. A selected list of summer opportunities is below.

June 9-13, 2013
Teacher Institute (Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, University of Georgia)
Exploring Brazil: A Window into the Language and Culture of a Country on the Rise
Location: Athens, GA
K-12 educators of any discipline and grade-level are welcome to apply. The goal of this institute is to encourage and promote the teaching of Portuguese and the culture of Brazil through film, literature, service learning, and technology in any K-12 classroom. During the week, educators will work in teams to develop interdisciplinary units that address applicable state learning standards. Educators may receive a certificate of completion for 20 hours of professional development if desired. Deadline to apply May 3, 2012

Contact:
Denise Woltering , 504.862.3143, dwolteri@tulane.edu
Kathleen Schmaltz, 706.583.0388, schmaltz@uga.edu
Claire Gonzalez, 615.343.1837, claire.p.gonzalez@vanderbilt.edu
To register and more information on prices please click here

June 11-14, 2013
Teacher Institute (Hemispheres outreach consortium, University of Texas)
Untangling World History
Location: Austin, TX
Hemispheres has been hearing from educator professionals with questions about the new State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness (STAAR) exam in World History. This year’s Summer Teachers’ Institute will focus extensively on the World History TEKS, with the intent of helping you gain the background knowledge you need to prepare your students for the rigors of the STAAR exam. The core of the workshop will consist of content presentations from scholars at the University of Texas on a myriad of state- and national standards-accessible topics in World History. Discussion sessions will focus on trends in history, covering key concepts, and “bundling” content and skills standards to help you cover topics efficiently in the classroom. Daily wrap-up exercises will involve working with primary source documents concerning the content presented that day to turn them into Document-Based Question (DBQ) activities to use with your students. You’ll leave with content, resources, primary documents, and a new outlook and enthusiasm for teaching world history!

Contact: Christopher Rose, 512.471.3582, csrose@austin.utexas.edu
To register and more information on prices please click here

June 16-23, 2013
Teacher Institute (University of Florida)
Discovering Ecosystems
Location: Belize
The Rainforest is YOUR Classroom! Shake up your professional development experience with the ultimate HANDS-ON learning experience in the rainforests of BELIZE! The UF Center for Latin American Studies Outreach Program is partnering with the Belize Foundation for Research and Environmental Education (BFREE). The institute is designed for and open to teachers and pre-service teachers of all disciplines and grade levels. We will be encouraging interdisciplinary connections in this program. *Some scholarships will be available.

Contact: Mary Risner, 352.273.4723, maryr@ufl.edu
To register and for more information on prices please click here

June 24-July 20, 2013
Online Course (UW-Milwaukee, 3 credits)
Using Children’s Literature to Explore Latin American/Latino Cultural Heritage
This course will focus primarily on children’s books that have been recommended by the Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature, sponsored by the national Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP). When read and explored as a body, together with supplemental readings/resources, Américas Award titles offer a unique resource with which to explore Latin America, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino cultures in all their diversity.

Contact: Julie Kline, 414.229.5986, jkline@uwm.edu
To register and for more information on prices please click here

July 8-12, 2013
Teacher Institute (PIER and CLAIS, Yale University, in collaboration with the Yale Peabody Museum)
Indigenous Cultures of the Americas and their Response to European Contact Across Time
Location: New Haven, CT
The summer institute will focus on a number of indigenous American cultures in the context of the extensive exchange of goods and ideas that took place with the European settlers. We’ll also explore the contemporary lives of indigenous peoples in the Americas, and consider the relationship of indigenous Americans today to those of the past. Our institute will feature first-hand explorations of Yale Peabody Museum collections, participation in seminars led by world-class scholars, and in-depth exchanges on select indigenous ethnic and tribal peoples, while offering practical tools to assist teachers in developing innovative approaches and resources for effective classroom teaching.

Contact: Margaret Marcotte, 203.432.3412, margaret.marcotte@yale.edu
To register and for more information on prices please click here

July 10-12, 2013
Teacher Institute (UW-Milwaukee)
Indigenous Movements in Contemporary Latin America
Location: Milwaukee, WI
In the past three decades, Indigenous peoples have been organizing in new and effective ways to counter their traditional exclusion in Latin American societies. These movements have sought land rights, protection of natural resources and the environment, cultural recognition and political rights. Many of the Indigenous peoples’ demands have become part of international human rights agreements and integrated into new constitutions of several Latin American nations. This summer institute will examine a variety of contemporary Indigenous movements with a particular focus on themes and materials about the topic that lend themselves to inclusion in Spanish language and global studies courses.

Contact: Julie Kline, 414.229.5986, jkline@uwm.edu
To register and for more information on prices please click here

For information on how to apply for funding from your local institute to any of these institutes, please visit the center’s site directly.

For a printable list of these institutes please download the PDF version here.

DECEMBER 14TH, 2012

Summer 2013 Less Commonly Taught Language Lists Now Available

CLASP-Executive-Committee-Meets-at-Vanderbilt
OCTOBER 12TH, 2012

CLASP Executive Committee Meets at Vanderbilt

The CLASP Executive Committee met at Vanderbilt’s Center for Latin American Studies on October 11-12, 2012 to map out the next year’s activities of the organization. The EC is very grateful to Vanderbilt for their wonderful hospitality during our meeting and stay. EC members in the picture (from left to right) include the following members.

  • Avery Dickens de Girón, Vanderbilt University
  • Matt Van Hoose, Indiana University
  • Valerie McGinley Marshalll, Tulane University
  • Elizabeth Sáenz Ackerman, Stanford University
  • Vince Gawronski, Birmingham-Southern College
  • Elizabeth Mahan, University of Connecticut
  • Julie Walsh, Georgetown University
  • Natalie Arsenault, University of Texas at Austin
  • David Arriaza, University of California Los Angeles
  • Amanda Wolfe, University of New Mexico
  • Paul Duncan, University of Georgia
  • Liesl Picard, Florida International University

Beatriz Riefkohl joined the meeting virtually from the University of North Carolina. Thanks to all EC members and their institutions for supporting the Consortium of Latin American Studies programs.

SEPTEMBER 21ST, 2012

Launch of CLASP Commissioned Paper Series

In support of CLASP’s international network of scholars, the CLASP commissioned paper series serves as a tool to highlight and disseminate cutting-edge research being conducted in the areas of language, teaching, outreach and administration and demonstrate the relevance of area studies to professional schools and diverse disciplines.

Commissioned papers will meet the following criteria:

Direct relevance to the CLASP mission
Likelihood for broad application among CLASP member institutions
Ability to have a measured impact on the strengthening of Latin American Studies programs
Contribution to new scholarship in given field

Contributing authors will be nominated by members of the CLASP Executive Committee; recommendations from CLASP members, including self-nominations, are encouraged as well.

Other details:
4 awards/year
$500/award
Editorial guidelines Non-restricted publication rights; Times New Roman; 12 pt.; 7+ pages; Papers must be submitted in final draft format; Brief narrative bio of the author submitted with paper

Sponsored by the Latin American and Caribbean Center (LACC) at Florida International University.

Margarita-Engle-Monica-Brown-and-Julie-Paschkis-win-2012-Amricas-Award
JUNE 28TH, 2012

Margarita Engle, Monica Brown, and Julie Paschkis win 2012 Américas Award

Monica Brown, author of “Pablo Neruda: Poet of the People” and illustrator Julie Paschkis, win the 2012 Américas Award along with Margarita Engle, author of “Hurricane Dancers: The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck.” Both books were selected for the 2012 award, given to books which engagingly portray Latin America, the Caribbean, or Latinos in the United States. The award links the Americas to reach beyond geographic borders, as well as multicultural-international boundaries, focusing instead upon cultural heritages within the hemisphere. The awards were announced today by the Consortium for Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP), during the Latin American Studies Association meeting held May 23 – 25 in San Francisco, CA.

The awards are administered by CLASP and coordinated by both Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies.

“Hurricane Dancers: The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck,” published by Henry Holt & Company, LLC is the story of a biracial, bilingual child named Quebrado, or “the broken one” told from multiple perspectives and in free verse poetry in this historical fiction text. Set during the early years of the Caribbean conquest (1509 or 1510), Quebrado reveals his own internal brokenness brought about by his Taíno mother’s death from a plague, the consequent abandonment of his Spanish father, followed by the capture of the powerful land owner-turned-pirate, Bernadino de Talavera. “This small text accurately portrays historical events and real people, while also presenting high interest themes in an accessible format. The multiple voices narrating the story allow readers to see inside the injustices and radically different perspectives of the time period, while the author’s notes link this story to her own family background, and provide important historical information and resources invaluable to teachers, librarians, and students alike” states chair of the committee, Ruth Quiroa.

Engle, recipient of the Américas Award in 2007 for “The Poet Slave of Cuba” and 2009 for “The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom” writes about young people who make “hopeful choices in situations that seemed hopeless” (margaritaengle.com). Her writing is inspired by her Cuban-American heritage and her love of tropical nature and writing.

“Pablo Neruda Poet of the People,” highlights the accomplishments of Chilean poet Pablo Neruda. The book is published by Henry Holt and Company, LLC. Committee member Hope Crandall states that “Brown and Paschkis have created a paean to renowned Chilean poet Pablo Neruda. A warm, lyrical text is embedded in soothing, color-saturated pictures. Streams of words, to delight the eye and ear, infuse the illustrations with surprising gems of multilingual word associations…Both provide a child-friendly introduction to aspects of Neruda’s life and, most prominently, to his passions for the natural world and the social concerns of his times.” The book is a great resource for children in grades 2 through 5. Monica Brown, recipient of a 2004 Américas Award for “My Name is Celia/ Me llamo Celia” is inspired by her Peruvian-American heritage and desire to share Latino/a stories with children.

Julie Paschkis’ illustrations make this book a “visual and thematic stunner” (www.kirkusreviews.com). Julie is the illustrator of several award-winning books, including “Night Garden: Poems from the World of Dreams” by Janet S. Wong, which was named a New York Times Best Illustrated Book; “Happy Adoption Day!” by John McCutcheon; and “Mrs. Chicken and the Hungry Crocodile” by Won-Ldy Paye and Margaret H. Lippert.

The Américas Committee selected two Honor Books; “Under the Mesquite” written by Guadalupe Garcia McCall published by Lee and Low books Inc. and “The Queen of Water” by Laura Resau and María Virginia Farinango published by Delacorte Press.

In “Under the Mesquite” Garcia McCall tells the story of high school student Lupita. Uprooted from her native Mexico, Lupita has to learn a new language and a new way of life in Texas. Currently a junior high-school English teacher, Mexican-born Garcia McCall immigrated to the United States at the age of six and grew up in a border town in Texas, which serves as the setting of her debut novel.

Laura Resau and María Virginia Farinango have written a beautiful memoir of a young Ecuadorean girl’s struggle to come to terms with her indigenous roots and the mestizo world into which she is thrown in “The Queen of Water.” Committee member, Barbara D’Ambruoso describes the story: “Taken to work as a care giver and servant for a mestizo family, she suffers abuse, humiliation, deceit, and manipulation, but eventually frees herself—only to realize that she has become a stranger to her birth culture, and is, in fact, embarrassed by it” (“Annotated Bibliographies” www.claspprograms.org/americasaward)

One commended title was selected this year by the committee, “Sylvia & Aki” written by Winifred Conkling published by Tricycle Press. Conkling parallels the experiences of two girls, one a Japanese-American and the other a Mexican-American. Told through the eyes of two young girls, Sylvia and Aki shows how friendship, family, and community can cross all racial, ethnic, linguistic, and national boundaries.

Members of the 2012 Américas Award Selection Committee are: Chair Ruth Quiroa, National-Louis University, Chicago, IL; Hope Crandall, Washington Elementary Library, Woodburn, OR; Aaron Forbes, Morris Jeff Community School, New Orleans, LA; América Calderón, Teaching for Change, Washington, DC; and Barbara D’Ambruoso, Lauralton Hall, Orange, CT.

CLASP’s mission is to promote all facets of Latin American studies throughout the world. Its broad range of activities include the encouragement of research activities, funding of professional workshops, advancement of citizen outreach activities, and development of teaching aids for the classroom. For more information on the Américas Award, please visit the website, claspprograms.org/americasaward or LIKE us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/americasaward

Americas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature Review Committee

  • Aaron Forbes (Morris Jeff Community School, LA)
  • América Calderón (Teaching for Change, Washington, DC)
  • Barbara D’Ambruoso (Lauralton Hall, CT)
  • Hope Crandall (Washington Elementary School, OR)
  • Ruth E. Quiroa, chairperson (National-Louis University, IL)

Award Coordinators
Denise Woltering Vargas
CLASP Committee on Teaching and Outreach
c/o The Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Tulane University
6801 Freret Ave.
New Orleans, LA 70118
504-862-3143 or dwolteri@tulane.edu

Claire González
CLASP Committee on Teaching and Outreach
c/o Center for Latin American Studies, Vanderbilt University
Station B VU Station B #351806
Nashville, TN 37235
615-322-2527 or claire.p.gonzalez@vanderbilt.edu

CLASP-at-LASA-2012
MARCH 13TH, 2012

CLASP at LASA 2012

CLASP is pleased to sponsor several sessions at the upcoming LASA Congress which will be held in San Francisco, CA from May 23 – 26, 2012.

The panels, Indocumentales Film Series: New Horizons in Outreach and Why LCTLs Matter: Sharing Knowledge Across Cultures, will focus on outreach and language, two subject areas of critical importance to CLASP members. CLASP will also hold its annual Outreach Meeting where members will have the opportunity to share best practices and identify areas of potential collaboration. The three sessions include participants from CLASP member institutions, including New York University, San Diego State University, Stanford University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Texas-Austin, and Vanderbilt University.

This year’s Business Meeting will include an overview of the previous year’s activities, reports from standing committees, and a vote on amendments to the Bylaws.

Click here for the full schedule of CLASP activities. CLASP LASA 2012

Summer-2012-Less-Commonly-Taught-Language-Lists-Now-Available
FEBRUARY 3RD, 2012

Summer 2012 Less Commonly Taught Language Lists Now Available

Our collective thanks to Avery Dickins de Girón for preparing the 2012 CLASP Lists of Less Commonly Taught Language Summer Programs. The Brazilian Portuguese, Indigenous Latin American languages, and Haitian Creole lists are now available to view and download in PDF format on the Language page.

CLASP-Promotes-Resources-at-Nations-Largest-Social-Studies-Educator-Conference-
JANUARY 24TH, 2012

CLASP Promotes Resources at Nation's Largest Social Studies Educator Conference

In 2011, for the second year in a row, a group of CLASP members collaborated to promote Latin American Studies resources at the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) annual conference. As the largest association in the country devoted solely to social studies education, NCSS is the umbrella organization for elementary, secondary, and college teachers of history, civics, geography, economics, political science, sociology, psychology, anthropology, and law-related education. Its annual conference generally attracts 3,000+ participants.

This year, under the auspices of the Outreach Committee, eight members of CLASP partnered to sponsor an exhibit booth that disseminated K–12 materials on Latin America to more than 200 conference attendees. We increased the visibility of CLASP and Latin America at the conference by distributing curriculum, publicizing our educational outreach activities (workshops, study abroad programs, lending libraries, etc.), and promoting the Américas Award.

In addition to the booth, the University of Miami, Tulane University, and University of Texas at Austin co-presented a poster session, Key Concepts in Teaching about Latin America. Poster presentations allow conference attendees to visit with several presenters during a single session and provide an opportunity for presenters to engage them in one-on-one interactions that address their interests and questions. Based on steady traffic and great interactions during the poster presentation, we plan to continue submitting proposals to present at NCSS.

Next stop: Seattle, November 16–18, 2012, for Opening Windows to the World—a theme that underscores CLASP’s core mission and gives us an opportunity to make a bigger splash. We welcome the participation of any interested CLASP member.

For more info, please contact:
Natalie Arsenault, Chair, Outreach Committee
University of Texas at Austin
n.arsenault@austin.utexas.edu
512/232-2404

2011-Amricas-Award-for-Childrens-and-Young-Adult-Literature
MARCH 28TH, 2011

2011 Américas Award for Children's and Young Adult Literature

Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP)

March 28, 2011

2011 Americas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature

The Américas Award is given in recognition of U.S. works of fiction, poetry, folklore, or selected non-fiction (from picture books to works for young adults) published in the previous year in English or Spanish that authentically and engagingly portray Latin America, the Caribbean, or Latinos in the United States. By combining both and linking the Americas, the award reaches beyond geographic borders, as well as multicultural-international boundaries, focusing instead upon cultural heritages within the hemisphere. The award is sponsored by the national Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP).

The award winners and commended titles are selected for their 1) distinctive literary quality; 2) cultural contextualization; 3) exceptional integration of text, illustration and design; and 4) potential for classroom use. The winning books will be honored at a ceremony (fall 2011) during Hispanic Heritage Month at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

2011 Americas Award Winners
Clemente! by Willie Perdomo. Illustrated by Bryan Collier. Holt, 2010 32 pgs. ISBN 978-0•8050-8224-1.
The Dreamer by Pam Muñoz Ryan, Illustrated by Peter Sis. Scholastic, 2010. 372 pgs. 978-0•439-26970-4.

Americas Award Honorable Mention
The Firefly Letters by Margarita Engle. Holt, 2010. 151 pgs. ISBN 978-0-8050-9082-6.

Americas Award Commended Titles
Arroz con Leche / Rice Pudding: Un poema para cocinar / A Cooking Poem by Jorge Argueta. Illustrated by Fernando Vilela. Groundwood, 2010. 32 pgs. ISBN 978-0-88899-981-8.
Biblioburro: A True Story from Colombia by Jeanette Winter. Beach Lane, 2010. 32 pgs. ISBN 978-1-4169-9778-8.
César Chávez: A Photographic Essay by Ilan Stavans. Cinco Puntos, 2010. 90 pgs. ISBN 978-1-933693-22-4
Dear Primo by Duncan Tonatiuh. Abrams, 2010. 32 pgs. ISBN 978-0-8109-3872-4.
Dizzy in your Eyes: Poems about Love by Pat Mora. Knopf, 2010. 168 pgs. ISBN 978-0•375-84375-4.
Eight Days: A Story of Haiti by Edwidge Danticat. Illustrated by Alix Delinois. Orchard, 2010. 28 pgs. ISBN 978-0-545-27849-2.
Fiesta Babies by Carmen Tafolla. Illustrated by Amy Córdova. Tricycle, 2010. 20 pgs. ISBN 978-1-58246-319-3.
From North to South / Del norte al Sur by René Colato Laínez. Illustrated by Joe Cepeda. Children’s Book Press, 2010. ISBN 978-0-89239-231-5.
Grandma’s Gift by Eric Velasquez. Bloomsbury, 2010. 32 pgs. ISBN 978-0-8027-2082-5.
How Tia Lola Learned to Teach by Julia Alvarez. Knopf, 2010. 135 pgs. ISBN 978-0-375•86460-5.
The Last Summer of the Death Warriors by Francisco X. Stork. Scholastic, 2010. 344 pgs. ISBN 978-0-545-15133-7.
Me, Frida by Amy Novesky. Illustrated by David Diaz. Abrams, 2010. 32 pgs. ISBN 978-0•8109-8969-6.
Napi funda un pueblo / Napi Makes a Village by Antonio Ramirez. Illustrated by Domi. Groundwood, 2010. 48 pgs. ISBN 978-0-88899-965-8.
Ole! Flamenco by George Ancona. Lee & Low, 2010. 48 pgs. ISBN 9778-1-60060-361-7
Star in the Forest by Laura Resau. Delacorte, 2010. 149 pgs. ISBN 978-0-385-73792-0.

Americas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature Review Committee

  • Hope Crandall (Washington Elementary School, OR)
  • Ruth E. Quiroa (National-Louis University, IL)
  • Hollis Rudiger (Madison West High School, WI)
  • Elena Serapiglia, chairperson (Amity Regional High School, CT)
  • Denise Woltering (Tulane University, LA)

Award Coordinator
Julie Kline
CLASP Committee on Teaching and Outreach
c/o The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201
(414) 229-5986 phone; (414) 229-2879 fax
jkline@uwm.edu

http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CLACS/aa/index.html